Episode Archives

Monday Fire: Be Secure and Settled with Tim Spiker

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Tim Spiker is taking over this episode with a message of how to be more inwardly sound and others focused.

Follow to get your Monday Fired up and hear more from Tim as he launches his own podcast on the PeopleForward Network.

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116: Leaders: Connect with Yourself | Tevis Trower

Tevis Trower is the CEO of Balance Integration where they have had the same mission for fifteen years: to humanize the work experience. 

We all overlook getting to know ourselves better. In this episode, you’ll hear Tevis explain why connecting with yourself is the first step to engaging the people around you. To learn more about the role of introspection and how understanding the person you want to become helps an organization grow and permits others to do the same, listen to the full episode.

Energize and inspire others to sharpen themselves by being introspective. Ultimately to be the person you want to be and the person you want to become.

Book Recommendations

Additional Resources

Truth You Can Act On 

1. Know Your “Why” to Know Your “How”
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Tevis Trower: “There’s always someone agitating and encouraging us to look inward. The problem is that often it becomes jargon, and even if it touches our heart, in the moment of the board meeting and the moment of who gets that next project, we don’t always pause and go to the next step and ask, ‘How do I behave? And what is the true self that I claim I’m trying to come from? How does that influence my how?’”

2. Take Time to Be with You
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Tevis Trower: “I had a client, and we started to look at how much time he carved out within the scope of a day to even allow himself to clear his mind so that he could be truly present. How much was he carrying over, and the emotion of one meeting into the next meeting? There was no space in his life. He would roll straight from work into being a great husband to his wife and a dad to three kids. There was literally no room in his life for him. Now, when you think about the lack of compassion towards self. Then you ask yourself, well, so what’s going to happen in a moment of conflict at work? Well, if there’s no room for compassion that means your nervous system is going to be triggered all the time. He had his great why, and he had a sense of his how, but he had to make space to be aligned with both throughout the day so they would then support his actions. So it’s carving out just a tiny bit of space for that clarity to work.”

3. Stop the “Shoulds”
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Tevis Trower: “No matter how you’ve heard it used, it keeps you from being in an authentic relationship with yourself and with others. The shoulds can often be inspired by what we see outside of us. Maybe if I do that, that’ll make me happy. Or,  maybe if I lead that way, that’ll make me more powerful. We then believe that somehow this aggregation is going to keep us safe and take us into this objective that we’ve chosen, that somehow we’ve associated with being the epitome of fulfillment for us right now, how this is really destructive is that it’s a waste of time. And unless the shoulds are being driven by an internal and intrinsic questioning of, “Does this feel right?” — remove them.”

4. Curious Leaders are Powerful Leaders
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Tevis Trower: “Shut up and learn. If you spend time with a leader, they are going to listen to you with rapt attention. Often, they’re going to be the last person to speak up. They’re absolutely not only learning from these conversations and from everyone on their team and from the news and from stakeholders and vendors, et cetera, they’re sponges because they know that they are just one brain. They’re just one set of patterns. They know that the more elastic they encourage their own kind of neuroplasticity to be, the more they’re going to be able to respond, to be resilient, to be aware, to actually see things as they’re starting to take shape.”

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Monday Fire Takeover: Check the Motives, Not the Boxes with Tim Spiker

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Tim Spiker is taking over this episode with a message of how to be more inwardly sound and others focused.

Follow to get your Monday Fired up and hear more from Tim as he launches his own podcast on the PeopleForward Network.

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115: Relationships Are Your Most Valuable Currency | Brian Mohr

Brian Mohr is the Co-founder of anthym, an interactive, patent-pending personal storytelling platform, leveraging the power of music to catalog some of the most meaningful and pivotal moments and memories in our lives. It’s mission? To help more people experience meaningful relationships, especially at work. 

Book Recommendations

Truth You Can Act On 

1. Vulnerability is the Core of Relationship Building
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Brian Mohr: “I saw a quote on Twitter that said, ‘Vulnerability is the currency of human connection.’ To me, if I think about all the best relationships I have in my life, whether they’re with colleagues, friends, or family, there’s a real sense of knowingness between the two individuals, between the folks in the relationship, and I think that can only come from being willing to open up and share who you really are as an individual and vice versa.”

2. Vulnerability + Trust Inspires People
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Brian Mohr: “Vulnerability is the currency of human connection. When we see, feel, or sense someone share more of who they are as human beings, we want to respond in kind. We don’t want them to feel alone, like they’re the only one out on the skinny branch sharing a personal story. We’ll often respond in kind, which then builds that vulnerability-based trust. That’s so critical. So I think at team meetings reserving time for people to share, maybe it’s a check-in, maybe it’s a story, but just something that is non-work-related that gives people a platform and an opportunity to talk more about what matters to them so that you really get to know them in a one-on-one setting.”

3. Take Time for Personal Conversation
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Brian Mohr: “Integrate a focus on one or two team members at every meeting and opening up the meeting with a story, having one of those team members share, whether it’s a personal story, something that happened in their past, or from the weekend, or maybe it’s a business story about an experience they had with a particular client. It tends to encourage them to go more towards the personal and move away from the business stuff, because most of the meeting content will be business-focused. So, reserve that time for personal stories. That shows that you as a leader are interested in learning more about who your teammates are, not just what they do.”

4. The Happiest People Have the Deepest Relationships
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Brian Mohr: “There’s this amazing Ted Talk titled “What Makes for a Good Life” delivered by Robert Waldinger, who’s the Executive Director of the Harvard Study of Adult Development. Over the course of 80 years, they’ve been running this longitudinal study, and what they’ve learned is no matter what level of affluence, wealth, materials, or success you’ve achieved in your life, the happiest people are those that have the best quality relationships in their lives. Don’t underestimate the power of building meaningful connections with our colleagues, given the amount of time we spend with them and work being such an important part of building a meaningful life, and having meaningful work, and part of meaningful work is actually having meaningful relationships with our colleagues.”

Monday Fire: Let Them Be Them

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you let your employees work in a way that fits them?

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Throwback: Leaders: Do You REALLY Work on You? | Tim Spiker

As leaders, we are often so focused on how to make our company or our employees better we forget to take time for our own development. Tim SpikerPresident and CEO of The Aperio Group, is a speaker, author, leadership consultant, and experience-creator led by the mission of making better leaders.

In this throwback episode, Nikki revisits the conversation she and Tim had around self-development techniques for leaders. He also answers the question, “As a leader, do you really work on you?” You’ll hear him discuss the importance of shifting our mindset to make sure we are constantly learning and developing, as well as how being trustworthy impacts employee engagement.

If at any point in 2021 you decide to join Tim and his team for one of their leadership development journeys, use the code “Gut+Science” in the promo box at checkout to get $500 off. To claim this offer go to their website: https://www.theaperio.com/

Book Recommendations

Truth You Can Act On 

1. Be Willing to Go Deep
Supporting Quote
Tim Spiker:  “This is very different than learning a new idea about the strategy, organizational development or business, or going much deeper than that. And so it’s really critical that we’d be willing to go to that depth. So that’s the first thing, depth. We need willingness in leaders to have the courage to look in the mirror. And by the way, the first time they do that, they’re already practicing because courage is something that’s very important in leadership. So there we go, we’re off and running, but it’s so important that we be willing to look under the hood of our own car that we’ve got to peel back and not simply look at actions. That’s a sucker thing to do. When it comes to leadership development, we have to be willing to look at motives and perspectives. We’ve got to go deeper than mere actions if we’re going to develop who we are as people.”

2. Community is Necessary
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Tim Spiker: “We need people that are going to help hold us accountable, because as we were talking earlier, this is a long slog. This is a tough road. This is far more a marathon mini sprint, and so we need people who are going to check in with us along the way…The other thing that comes along with community besides accountability is the opportunity to learn. I get to hear your stories, I ask a follow on question in a meeting where I wouldn’t have normally, and I learned so much more and I really felt like I had a better relationship with the person I was interacting with than I did even before that conversation.”

3. Life is a Marathon, Not a Sprint
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Tim Spiker: “This is brushing your teeth. You have to stay engaged with working on who you are a little bit every day, every week, and so over time, you get a chance to be in all of those leadership opportunities. The lab is your real life of leading, and time gives us a chance to push into those things.”

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Monday Fire Takeover: Let Me Know How I Can Help with Liesel Mertes

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. This episode is getting taken over by Liesel Mertes, Founder of Handle with Care Consulting and host of the Handle with Care: Empathy at Work podcast.  

In this episode she explains why the phrase “Let me know how I can help” isn’t the best way to support a friend or coworker.

Follow to get your Monday Fired up.

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Healthcare Series: Help Your People Find Their Gifts | Dr. Norma Tirado

Dr. Norma Tirado is the Vice President of Team Member Experience and Talent Development at Spectrum Health, where she strives to help her people find their gifts and pursue them in their careers.

In this episode, her passion shines through as she talks about ways leaders can help their own employees and peers identify their strengths to reach their full potential.

Book Recommendations: 

Sponsor Resources

  • Digital Events – Look out for upcoming Wambi events giving you exclusive access to best practices from top healthcare leaders and access on-demand recordings of past events and access past leadership panels on-demand .
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Truth You Can Act On:

  • Your Strengths Should Be Your Key Focus

Supporting Quote

Dr. Norma Tirado: “Since we were little we have grown up focusing on the things that we have to improve. What are our weaknesses? So many people never have the opportunity to focus on their strengths. So, it often takes somebody else in your life, a mentor, a colleague, a friend, a parent to say, ‘You know, you’re really good at this. This is something you should pay attention to.’”

  • Ask Great Questions

Supporting Quote

Dr. Norma Tirado: “I think part of helping people find their gifts is to ask a lot of questions, to do a lot of listening, to see where people’s eyes brighten. When you say, ‘Hey, I need you to do this,’ you’re really trying to help people look at what they enjoy doing the most and helping just bring that out in their work…I ask people questions, like, tell me about when you would consider a really great day in your work life, or tell me about the most enjoyable project that you have ever worked on. What was it about that project that brought you so much joy? What is the one thing that you dread doing and why do you not like doing that? I’ll ask questions about what is important to them to figure out what they enjoy and what they don’t enjoy.”

  • Push Those You Lead Outside Their Comfort Zone

Supporting Quote

Dr. Norma Tirado: “To discover your gifts sometimes you have to take risks. You have to do things that you haven’t done before. One time a CEO asked me to lead the IT department of my organization and I did have an IT background. So I had to know that. I needed to take that risk that I’m probably going to get my knees scraped.  I’m going to make mistakes, but I’m going to learn from them, and then I found out that, again, leadership was a gift for me. No matter what area of the organization I was leading. And you can always learn some of the technical stuff. So getting uncomfortable, taking risks, asking your leaders a lot of questions, pushing them outside of the boundaries of their comfort is going to help them find their gifts.”

Monday Fire Takeover: Tell Me More with Liesel Mertes

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. This episode is getting taken over by Liesel Mertes, Founder of Handle with Care Consulting and host of the Handle with Care: Empathy at Work podcast.  

In this episode she discusses how powerful the phrase “tell me more” can be in the workplace.

Follow to get your Monday Fired up.

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114: Success VS. Significance – a Tale of “Do Meaningful Work, Live Meaningful Life” | Mark Whitacre

What is the difference between leading a life of success and leading a life of significance? 

In his 30s, Mark Whitacre defined success as a seven-figure salary, a 13,000-foot home with an eight-car garage, and flying on corporate jets all over the world. That was a reality. But because of his involvement in one of the largest white-collar price-fixing cases in US history, he was sent to federal prison. Suddenly the large salary shrunk to $20 a month as he worked to help fellow prison mates earn their GEDs.

In this episode, Mark reveals how he found more fulfillment in the work he did in prison than in his corporate job. Hear why pursuing meaningful work is more rewarding, makes us more productive, and ultimately gives us the space to make a difference. 

Listen to the full conversation to learn how to help your employees do meaningful work and lead a life of significance. 

Book Recommendations: 

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Significance is Service to Others
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Mark Whitacre: “I never helped anybody but myself, but then I went to prison, and I saw how rewarding it was to help others in need. I’ve been out of prison 15 years now, since 2006, and I’ve continued that path of a life of more significance. It’s how I want to finish my life with however many years I have left. I want to finish my life focused on a life of significance rather than a life of success. And that really, to me, means being a servant leader and trying to leave the world a better place when you leave it than when you came into it.”

2. Healthy Mentors Are Powerful
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Mark Whitacre: “Look around and think about who you want to be as you continue to grow in your journey as a leader in your organization. It’s going to be someone older and wiser, and I think that’s just important to have the right mentor in your life. No matter where you work and no matter where you’re living, there are people around you that love to pour into the younger people into the next generation. I think all of us in our lifetimes should have a mentor in our lives, and I think we should all be mentoring others that are younger than us during our lifetime.”

3. Great Leaders Share Vulnerably 
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Mark Whitacre: “The last 24 years I’ve mentored several people, but probably one of the most significant was a medical doctor that I got to know. And he was on a very similar track that I was probably in my thirties: all about himself, or a large seven-figure income, being a surgeon and very much a selfish leader. He read about me and heard about me and reached out and wanted to know if I could spend some time with him. I became his mentor, and it’s amazing how I’ve seen him grow in the last four or five years. He’s changed tremendously to become the servant leader that I feel strongly that God built him to be. I’ve seen him become a better father, a better husband, and serve others. In the hospital, he loves seeing others get promoted instead of just always himself. He helps others get promoted and recommends others in the hospital and he serves and mentors others around him. All things he didn’t do before.”

4. Do Meaningful Work
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Mark Whitacre: “I was in federal prison at age 40, making $20 a month, and I helped these guys in prison get their GED. Some of them learned how to read. Some of them I helped to get two-year degrees through correspondence. Some of them were eighth grade dropouts and I had the opportunity to help them get their GED and two-year college degrees through correspondence. And I tell you, those years became some of the most productive years of my life at $20 a month. Going through that journey, I learned the difference between a life of success, the way the world defines success, compared to a life of significance.”

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