Podcast

Monday Fire: Let Them Be Them

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you let your employees work in a way that fits them?

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Throwback: Leaders: Do You REALLY Work on You? | Tim Spiker

As leaders, we are often so focused on how to make our company or our employees better we forget to take time for our own development. Tim SpikerPresident and CEO of The Aperio Group, is a speaker, author, leadership consultant, and experience-creator led by the mission of making better leaders.

In this throwback episode, Nikki revisits the conversation she and Tim had around self-development techniques for leaders. He also answers the question, “As a leader, do you really work on you?” You’ll hear him discuss the importance of shifting our mindset to make sure we are constantly learning and developing, as well as how being trustworthy impacts employee engagement.

If at any point in 2021 you decide to join Tim and his team for one of their leadership development journeys, use the code “Gut+Science” in the promo box at checkout to get $500 off. To claim this offer go to their website: https://www.theaperio.com/

Book Recommendations

Truth You Can Act On 

1. Be Willing to Go Deep
Supporting Quote
Tim Spiker:  “This is very different than learning a new idea about the strategy, organizational development or business, or going much deeper than that. And so it’s really critical that we’d be willing to go to that depth. So that’s the first thing, depth. We need willingness in leaders to have the courage to look in the mirror. And by the way, the first time they do that, they’re already practicing because courage is something that’s very important in leadership. So there we go, we’re off and running, but it’s so important that we be willing to look under the hood of our own car that we’ve got to peel back and not simply look at actions. That’s a sucker thing to do. When it comes to leadership development, we have to be willing to look at motives and perspectives. We’ve got to go deeper than mere actions if we’re going to develop who we are as people.”

2. Community is Necessary
Supporting Quote
Tim Spiker: “We need people that are going to help hold us accountable, because as we were talking earlier, this is a long slog. This is a tough road. This is far more a marathon mini sprint, and so we need people who are going to check in with us along the way…The other thing that comes along with community besides accountability is the opportunity to learn. I get to hear your stories, I ask a follow on question in a meeting where I wouldn’t have normally, and I learned so much more and I really felt like I had a better relationship with the person I was interacting with than I did even before that conversation.”

3. Life is a Marathon, Not a Sprint
Supporting Quote
Tim Spiker: “This is brushing your teeth. You have to stay engaged with working on who you are a little bit every day, every week, and so over time, you get a chance to be in all of those leadership opportunities. The lab is your real life of leading, and time gives us a chance to push into those things.”

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Monday Fire Takeover: Let Me Know How I Can Help with Liesel Mertes

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. This episode is getting taken over by Liesel Mertes, Founder of Handle with Care Consulting and host of the Handle with Care: Empathy at Work podcast.  

In this episode she explains why the phrase “Let me know how I can help” isn’t the best way to support a friend or coworker.

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Healthcare Series: Help Your People Find Their Gifts | Dr. Norma Tirado

Dr. Norma Tirado is the Vice President of Team Member Experience and Talent Development at Spectrum Health, where she strives to help her people find their gifts and pursue them in their careers.

In this episode, her passion shines through as she talks about ways leaders can help their own employees and peers identify their strengths to reach their full potential.

Book Recommendations: 

Sponsor Resources

  • Digital Events – Look out for upcoming Wambi events giving you exclusive access to best practices from top healthcare leaders and access on-demand recordings of past events and access past leadership panels on-demand .
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Truth You Can Act On:

  • Your Strengths Should Be Your Key Focus

Supporting Quote

Dr. Norma Tirado: “Since we were little we have grown up focusing on the things that we have to improve. What are our weaknesses? So many people never have the opportunity to focus on their strengths. So, it often takes somebody else in your life, a mentor, a colleague, a friend, a parent to say, ‘You know, you’re really good at this. This is something you should pay attention to.’”

  • Ask Great Questions

Supporting Quote

Dr. Norma Tirado: “I think part of helping people find their gifts is to ask a lot of questions, to do a lot of listening, to see where people’s eyes brighten. When you say, ‘Hey, I need you to do this,’ you’re really trying to help people look at what they enjoy doing the most and helping just bring that out in their work…I ask people questions, like, tell me about when you would consider a really great day in your work life, or tell me about the most enjoyable project that you have ever worked on. What was it about that project that brought you so much joy? What is the one thing that you dread doing and why do you not like doing that? I’ll ask questions about what is important to them to figure out what they enjoy and what they don’t enjoy.”

  • Push Those You Lead Outside Their Comfort Zone

Supporting Quote

Dr. Norma Tirado: “To discover your gifts sometimes you have to take risks. You have to do things that you haven’t done before. One time a CEO asked me to lead the IT department of my organization and I did have an IT background. So I had to know that. I needed to take that risk that I’m probably going to get my knees scraped.  I’m going to make mistakes, but I’m going to learn from them, and then I found out that, again, leadership was a gift for me. No matter what area of the organization I was leading. And you can always learn some of the technical stuff. So getting uncomfortable, taking risks, asking your leaders a lot of questions, pushing them outside of the boundaries of their comfort is going to help them find their gifts.”

Monday Fire Takeover: Tell Me More with Liesel Mertes

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. This episode is getting taken over by Liesel Mertes, Founder of Handle with Care Consulting and host of the Handle with Care: Empathy at Work podcast.  

In this episode she discusses how powerful the phrase “tell me more” can be in the workplace.

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114: Success VS. Significance – a Tale of “Do Meaningful Work, Live Meaningful Life” | Mark Whitacre

What is the difference between leading a life of success and leading a life of significance? 

In his 30s, Mark Whitacre defined success as a seven-figure salary, a 13,000-foot home with an eight-car garage, and flying on corporate jets all over the world. That was a reality. But because of his involvement in one of the largest white-collar price-fixing cases in US history, he was sent to federal prison. Suddenly the large salary shrunk to $20 a month as he worked to help fellow prison mates earn their GEDs.

In this episode, Mark reveals how he found more fulfillment in the work he did in prison than in his corporate job. Hear why pursuing meaningful work is more rewarding, makes us more productive, and ultimately gives us the space to make a difference. 

Listen to the full conversation to learn how to help your employees do meaningful work and lead a life of significance. 

Book Recommendations: 

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Significance is Service to Others
Supporting Quote
Mark Whitacre: “I never helped anybody but myself, but then I went to prison, and I saw how rewarding it was to help others in need. I’ve been out of prison 15 years now, since 2006, and I’ve continued that path of a life of more significance. It’s how I want to finish my life with however many years I have left. I want to finish my life focused on a life of significance rather than a life of success. And that really, to me, means being a servant leader and trying to leave the world a better place when you leave it than when you came into it.”

2. Healthy Mentors Are Powerful
Supporting Quote
Mark Whitacre: “Look around and think about who you want to be as you continue to grow in your journey as a leader in your organization. It’s going to be someone older and wiser, and I think that’s just important to have the right mentor in your life. No matter where you work and no matter where you’re living, there are people around you that love to pour into the younger people into the next generation. I think all of us in our lifetimes should have a mentor in our lives, and I think we should all be mentoring others that are younger than us during our lifetime.”

3. Great Leaders Share Vulnerably 
Supporting Quote
Mark Whitacre: “The last 24 years I’ve mentored several people, but probably one of the most significant was a medical doctor that I got to know. And he was on a very similar track that I was probably in my thirties: all about himself, or a large seven-figure income, being a surgeon and very much a selfish leader. He read about me and heard about me and reached out and wanted to know if I could spend some time with him. I became his mentor, and it’s amazing how I’ve seen him grow in the last four or five years. He’s changed tremendously to become the servant leader that I feel strongly that God built him to be. I’ve seen him become a better father, a better husband, and serve others. In the hospital, he loves seeing others get promoted instead of just always himself. He helps others get promoted and recommends others in the hospital and he serves and mentors others around him. All things he didn’t do before.”

4. Do Meaningful Work
Supporting Quote
Mark Whitacre: “I was in federal prison at age 40, making $20 a month, and I helped these guys in prison get their GED. Some of them learned how to read. Some of them I helped to get two-year degrees through correspondence. Some of them were eighth grade dropouts and I had the opportunity to help them get their GED and two-year college degrees through correspondence. And I tell you, those years became some of the most productive years of my life at $20 a month. Going through that journey, I learned the difference between a life of success, the way the world defines success, compared to a life of significance.”

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Monday Fire Takeover: Take All the Time You Need with Liesel Mertes

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. This episode is getting taken over by Liesel Mertes, Founder of Handle with Care Consulting and host of the Handle with Care: Empathy at Work podcast.  

In this episode she explains why you need to eliminate the phrase, “Take all the time you need” from your vocabulary.

Follow to get your Monday Fired up.

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Monday Fire: You Deserve a Fired Up Life

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you fire up your life?

Follow to get your Monday Fired up.

 

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Healthcare Series: Cultivating a Culture of Diversity and Inclusion | Ophelia Byers

Ophelia Byers is the VP and Chief Nursing Officer at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. She has more than 20 years of leadership experience, and in this episode, she discusses her passion: racism-related stress in the workplace. 

Listen as Ophelia shares moving stories of employees who have had such experiences and what leaders should be doing to gain awareness on this problem.

Book Recommendations: 

Sponsor Resources

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Assume We All Have the Opportunity to Sharpen Awareness
Supporting Quote
Ophelia Byers: “There is not always the awareness of what someone’s lived experience is at work. Our obligation is to do some vision correction, and that comes through awareness. It comes through learning and self-study. It comes through a variety of ways, but we have to first recognize that we do not see all and that we really need diverse perspectives from a diverse group of individuals to be able to be more aware.”

2. Identify Risks and Challenges to Prioritize Focus for Change
Supporting Quote
Ophelia Byers: “When we think about quality, we first think there are roadblocks. There are potential problems. There are actual problems. So first, it starts with problem identification or risk identification. That’s important, and that’s where that awareness comes in. Let’s all just assume that there’s an opportunity to dig deeper, think more expansively. So, in that risk identification or problem identification, you’re thinking about what are your employees going through. What are the safety risks? What are the adverse events or near misses and anyone in healthcare, we certainly understand those terms around the employee experience. Usually, we do it around patient safety, but let’s do it around the psychological safety of our employees.”

3. Diversity and Inclusion Is a Process
Supporting Quote
Ophelia Byers: “There should be a process to this. What we don’t want to do is treat diversity as something that, if we have multicultural potlucks or have “Wear Your Ethnic Attire to Work” day, or just have the crucial conversations around diversity. Those are all wonderful things that can certainly boost morale, but beyond boosting morale, what does structural change look like? And so making sure that there is a methodical approach to this, which this quality management approach can help improve, by taking all the information that we’ve gleaned and putting together an improvement process. Organized healthcare organizations are very familiar with processes, like plan, do, study, but really taking out some higher level themes and starting to say, okay, this is what we need to work on.”

4. Constantly Evaluate Your Organization’s Diversity
Supporting Quote
Ophelia Byers: “It’s continuing to have those dialogues to check back, continuing to monitor if our interventions have been effective. How are they landing with people? Is what we hope to achieve actually occurring? And it’s circling back to people that you spoke with to understand if the interventions that were put in place are going as intended. So, it is this self-check process to ensure safety through standardization, to ensure high reliability. And I think that in taking this approach, there’s not one organization that doesn’t understand quality. And so making diversity and inclusion about quality of care, not only for the customer, but also for the internal customer, for our employees, is a great way to promote structural change.”

 

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Monday Fire Takeover: Six things to say INSTEAD of “stop crying” with Andrea Butcher

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Andrea Butcher, President of HRD Advisory Group, takes over this episode to share other ways to respond to a team member experiencing emotion. Here we go!

To hear more from Andrea, check out her podcast Being [at Work] and listen to the Daily Dose episodes.

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