Podcast

Monday Fire Takeover: Conscious Connections with Vicki Hess

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Today, employee engagement expert Vicki Hess takes over to give some advice. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you consciously connect with your employees?

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Healthcare Series: Human Connection | Cassandra Crowe-Jackson

Cassandra Crowe-Jackson is the Chief Experience Officer at Sharp HealthCare with over 20 years of leadership experience in the industry. She is passionate about human connection and its power to create meaningful impact.

In this episode, Cassandra shares her best practices for daily meaningful connection with team members, as well as ways to make the most out of virtual connection.


Truth You Can Act On 

1. Increase Your Visibility
Supporting Quote
Cassandra Crowe-Jackson: “We’ve been talking about leadership visibility, because even our leaders, our executive team, we’ve been told you’re working from home from now on. So how is it that you’re going to be able to connect with your team, especially, you know, in a 24/7environment? So, you know, we do have our entity or facility leadership or the CEOs and the executive teams rounding just to say to that team, ‘Thank you.  I know you’re here.’ Our CEO, as a matter of fact, did midnight rounds at one of our facilities that are more heavily impacted because you think about those nurses and doctors that are working that weekend night shift. They aren’t getting a lot of human connection.”

2. Incorporate Personal Check-in’s 
Supporting Quote
Cassandra Crowe-Jackson: “I’ve had to have a ton of virtual meetings. So when I start my virtual meetings and begin, you know, I always try to find the one question about you. It will be something more of my icebreaker in terms of, ‘What was the best thing that happened to you yesterday?’ Because that kind of stops people for a moment. Because they’re prepared to tell me all about their work and their role and what they can do to help me or what I could do to help them, but when I have taken that pulse and that beat, just to say, ‘What was the best thing that happened to you?’ Or, “What made your day?’ Or, ‘What were three things you were most grateful for yesterday?’ It kind of says, stop a moment and let’s connect here as humans first, and then we can talk business.”

3. Look for the Silver Lining 
Supporting Quote
Cassandra Crowe-Jackson: “Now for every hour of time, you log in that says you exercise, you are contributing one meal. So they’re taking that to mean five hours of walking is one meal for four people or something like that. So it’s again saying, ‘Keep doing what you’re doing, stay healthy, but while you’re staying healthy, you’re going to be helping people eat.’ San Diego has a lot of homelessness and a lot of hungry people, as does everyone in the country, and I can see feedback in the chats about, you know, what people are doing and how they feel connected to purpose still to our, our vision and our mission.”

Book Recommendations

Sponsor

  • Wambi.org – Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Monday Fire Takeover: The Importance of Rounding with Vicki Hess

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Today, employee engagement expert Vicki Hess takes over to give some advice. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you incorporate rounding in your routine?

Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

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Episode 107: Leaders: Do You REALLY Work on You? | Tim Spiker

As leaders, we are often so focused on how to make our company or our employees better we forget to take time for our own development. Tim Spiker, President and CEO of The Aperio Group, is a speaker, author, leadership consultant, and experience-creator led by the mission of making better leaders.

In this episode, Tim shares self-development techniques for leaders and answers the question, “As a leader, do you really work on you?” You’ll hear him discuss the importance of shifting our mindset to make sure we are constantly learning and developing, as well as how being trustworthy impacts employee engagement. 

If at any point in 2021 you decide to join Tim and his team for one of their leadership development journeys, use the code “Gut+Science” in the promo box at checkout to get $500 off. To claim this offer go to their website: https://www.theaperio.com/


Truth You Can Act On 

1. Be Willing to Go Deep
Supporting Quote
Tim Spiker:  “This is very different than learning a new idea about the strategy, organizational development or business, or going much deeper than that. And so it’s really critical that we’d be willing to go to that depth. So that’s the first thing, depth. We need willingness in leaders to have the courage to look in the mirror. And by the way, the first time they do that, they’re already practicing because courage is something that’s very important in leadership. So there we go, we’re off and running, but it’s so important that we be willing to look under the hood of our own car that we’ve got to peel back and not simply look at actions. That’s a sucker thing to do. When it comes to leadership development, we have to be willing to look at motives and perspectives. We’ve got to go deeper than mere actions if we’re going to develop who we are as people.”

2. Community is Necessary
Supporting Quote
Tim Spiker: “We need people that are going to help hold us accountable, because as we were talking earlier, this is a long slog. This is a tough road. This is far more a marathon mini sprint, and so we need people who are going to check in with us along the way…The other thing that comes along with community besides accountability is the opportunity to learn. I get to hear your stories, I ask a follow on question in a meeting where I wouldn’t have normally, and I learned so much more and I really felt like I had a better relationship with the person I was interacting with than I did even before that conversation.”

3. Life is a Marathon, Not a Sprint
Supporting Quote
Tim Spiker: “This is brushing your teeth. You have to stay engaged with working on who you are a little bit every day, every week, and so over time, you get a chance to be in all of those leadership opportunities. The lab is your real life of leading, and time gives us a chance to push into those things.”

Book Recommendations

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Monday Fire: Never Stop Building Relationships

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you continue to build relationships?

Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

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Monday Fire: Who Will Help You Reach Goals?

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

Who can help push you to reach your goals?

Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

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Monday Fire: Maximize the Good to Better

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!
Our question for you today:
What can you maximize your life?
Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

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[Throwback] The Keys to Developing Effective Mentorship Programs | Alison Martin

Alison Martin is the Founder and CEO of Engage Mentoring, a mentoring movement seeking to elevate people in the workplace. She is also the author of Learning to Lead Through Mentoring: 8 Mentoring Lessons to Help You Pursue Meaningful Mentoring Relationships.

Alison’s passion for mentorship comes from reflecting on the opportunities she had early in her career. She credits her success to the great mentors who helped her realize her leadership potential. Because of the positive effect mentorship has had on both her professional and personal life, she now strives to equip others with the opportunity for meaningful mentor relationships.

In this throwback episode, listen as Alison and Nikki discuss how mentorship can increase employee engagement. Not only does it help transfer knowledge to help mold strong leaders, but Alison believes it gives employees a stronger sense of purpose knowing there’s someone else invested in their development. 

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Learn and Master Feedback
Supporting Quote
Alison Martin: “As I look back, there are several people that come to mind, honestly, but the one that was really instrumental in my career was a woman by the name of Pat. I first met Pat when I put my hat in the ring for a position that I was wholly unqualified for, and she gave me an interview anyway. And I ended up working for Pat for a period of time. And she was both. So when I reported to, but also a mentor for me, which not always is the case for most people, but she was, she really took me under her wing and gave me the feedback that I needed when I needed it, and that’s not always fun, but that’s what ultimately helps you grow.”

2. Develop a Personal Board of Directors
Supporting Quote
Alison Martin: “In other words, if I want to develop my skills as a public speaker, or I want to be more effective as a team builder, I can go in and identify people who have identified that particular competency. And it’s a much faster way to learn than going out and having to take a course or look at some other resource. And finally, the last category is having a career mentor. Someone who really understands what your career goals are and can help you really see a path  and offer strategic advice for how you’re going to get there. And so whether you have one person, or multiple people,  it’s not the frequency as much as it’s really feeling like you have a well-rounded personal board of directors.”

3. Leaders Must Participate
Supporting Quote
Alison Martin: “On the surface, you look at mentoring, you think, okay, that’s a learning strategy. So we’re going to help people who have knowledge and wisdom to transfer that knowledge to the next generation. And certainly, we can all agree that that is an important piece of this, but mentoring also impacts employee engagement because like I said, feeling like there’s someone else there who is pouring into you really cares about your development is a critical piece in the overall engagement. Iit also impacts diversity inclusion. So being able to connect to others on the basis of the knowledge and really empowered to take charge of your own development. And then lastly, I think just an overall culture in terms of when you teach people how to teach and how to lead effectively for others.”

4. Measuring Impact Through Intentionality
Supporting Quote
Alison Martin: “We first seek to understand if they are in fact measuring employee engagement numbers and what those numbers are telling them. And so through their diagnostic services, what’s our baseline? Because that helps us really understand what it is we’re trying to accomplish and what we’re trying to impact. And so, over time seeing movement and the numbers of people who are actively engaged,  seeing things like promotability as a result of structured mentoring. So we try to seek to understand, you know, what are your employee engagement numbers telling you now, and how are you measuring that?”

Book Recommendation

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[Throwback] Healthcare Series: Employee Engagement in Healthcare | Vicki Hess

Vicki Hess is an engagement expert, author, thought-leader, and speaker, and she is passionate about inspiring healthcare leaders to take action and transform engagement. 

In this throwback episode, listen in as she and Nikki reveal the tools you need to create the environment you and your employees want to work in.

Learn more about Vicki at vickihess.com.

Truth You Can Act On

1. Make Engagement Part of the Organization’s Strategy 
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “What I see that doesn’t work is when the survey becomes a big push, it becomes like the flavor of the month. And all of the sudden now we’re focusing on the survey and we want everyone to do the survey. And if you turn in your ticket, you’re gonna get a prize. And the managers like, please, please, please take this survey. And Edwards like, oh, whatever, you know, and they take this survey. And the reason they say, oh, whatever is because last year when this happened, the survey results came back. They had the requisite action planning meeting. They all got in a room. They looked at the results. They said what they wanted to have to get better. And then they never heard anything again.”

2. Take Action
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “When somebody says to me, we have a people pillar and it’s an agenda item on every single meeting we have and all of our performance reviews are related to that and et cetera. Then I’m like, they’ve got a strategic connection. So the organizations that do well with sustaining engagement over time, they go from what I call engagement dread where the managers like, oh, I got to talk about the survey and, you know, do an action plan to the engagement thread where you weave engagement into everything that you’re doing. “

3. Make Manager Engagement Skills a Priority 
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “If it’s truly important, it’s got to be part of the strategy. It doesn’t have to be compensation related for leaders, but it definitely has to be some measure of their success has to be related to the engagement levels of their team. The other thing is there’s got to be the tools for training and teaching managers how to be effective, engaging leaders. And it can’t be a flavor of the month.”

4. Right Mindset and Belief Make Strategies Work
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “These unproductive beliefs and mindsets that organizations let thrive, that they let go on are often the cause of disengagement. At an organizational level, then leaders feel helpless. Their mindset might be, but what can I do about this? And then individuals there, their negative mindset as well. It’s somebody else’s job to make me happy at work. And so unless those things are addressed and talked about. Now, the cool thing is we know what the unproductive beliefs are. We just have to be willing to talk about this elephant in the room or the sacred cow.”

Book Recommendation

Sponsor

Wambi.orgWambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Monday Fire: Advancing Your Core Values

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!
Our question for you today:
What steps can you take to advance your core values?
Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

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