Podcast

Monday Fire Takeover: Outward Mindset with Rosie Ward

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. This episode is getting taken over by Rosie Ward, CEO and Co-founder of Salveo Partners. Listen in as she shares the differences between leading with an inner mindset versus an outward mindset and how that affects the workplace.

Follow to get your Monday Fired up.

Want to hear more from Rosie? Follow her podcast Show Up As a Leader.

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Performa Subseries: Surrender Control and Empower | Chris Howald

Chris Howald is the CEO at Tweet/Garot Mechanical, Inc. and is a fourth generation leader where he believes he is a steward to his employees and the business instead of just an owner.

In this subseries, Nikki has partnered with Performa, a purpose-driven, fully integrated architecture, engineering, and design firm that gives people (and purpose) the space to thrive. In this episode, Chris, Nikki, and co-host Brian Netzel of Performa discuss what it looks like to surrender control to empower your people to perform at their best.

Book Recommendations

Additional Resources

Truth You Can Act On 

1. Surrender Control
Supporting Quote
Chris Howald: “I think a lot of leaders landed in leadership positions based on being really good at whatever the task or role or responsibility that they were in. And that typically meant they had good control, right? They were micromanagers. They were in control of everything. They knew every detail about every aspect of their job. When you get into a leadership position beyond that, your first tendency is to continue doing the things that got you there, when the first rule of leadership is actually the exact opposite. You need to forget about all those things that got you there and you need to start thinking about how you can get others to make some of the same decisions or to build the same habits that you made when you were in your role.”

2. Listening Is Not Reacting
Supporting Quote
Chris Howald: “The first rule of listening is just not reacting. It’s being very present and kind of mindful. For years I started listening, and then I started reacting before someone was even finished speaking because I was going to be defensive. I was going to be counterarguing, and that doesn’t work in leadership. It works in the courtroom, but it doesn’t work in leadership. So I now try really hard to just not react and assume positive intent because I don’t want to react emotionally either. I know that there are likely two sides to every story and I have to sort of be really neutral.”

3. Focus on Treating Your People Well
Supporting Quote
Chris Howald: “I ask at the end of every session, how can I be better? How can I help you do your job better? And that’s okay. Because I want to be involved in what they’re doing. It’s because I want their feedback. I almost obsess over feedback and, not in a negative way, but in an attempt for me to continue to gain awareness as to where I can be impactful, how I can add value and to offer things to them that they might not think a CEO would normally do.”

4. Does Your Workspace Help You Pour into Your People?
Supporting Quote
Chris Howald: “We have all these collaboration spaces and we have process maps up on the wall where we can literally just gather people within an instant. We can get 50 or 60 people gathered so that we can all report on the progress that we’re making around some of our operational objectives. One really good example is we do weekly sprints. We just want to get everybody together and communicate progress. With these small wins, we’re able to just have everybody up from their workstations, look at the board, and we’re off. It’s just a very different process — a lot more energizing and people feel more informed.”

 

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Monday Fire Takeover: Upgrade Your Inner Operation System with Rosie Ward

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. This episode is getting taken over by Rosie Ward, CEO and Co-founder of Salveo Partners. Listen in as she shares why leaders need to upgrade their inner operating system and how it effects performance.

Follow to get your Monday Fired up.

Want to hear more from Rosie? Follow her podcast Show Up As a Leader.

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Throwback: Debunking Common Training Myths | Amy Woodall

Amy Woodall is the President of Sandler Training Trustpointe. For the past 20 years, the company has specialized in training, coaching, and assessments for individuals, teams, and organizations looking to foster techniques to grow sales and increase clientele.

In this throwback episode, Nikki revisits  her conversation with Amy as she describes her craft as “business therapy,” providing “mental Interventions” for large to mid-sized companies. She focuses on the true core of what holds many companies back: the negative self-doubts within employees themselves. By first assessing the needs of the individual, she uses these voices together to build a more robust and accountable workforce.

She believes in the power of the engaged worker. To produce engagement, Amy strives to foster environments of vulnerability. By knowing that their questions and concerns are welcome, Amy attests that employees will take more ownership in their own personal success.

Book Recommendations

Additional Resources


Truth You Can Act On 

1. Leaders Must Be Involved
Supporting Quote
Amy Woodall: “I think it’s a must. Another myth is people say, we have these low performers and they need to be fixed. I think it’s done with the best of intentions, but in order for real growth, you’ve got to train everybody. To be trained consistently and to have leadership involved not only means that they’re learning the same stuff so that they can then keep them accountable internally, but once they’re outside of those training walls they’re speaking the same language. They’re also showing, hey, I wanted to learn and I wanted to make a difference. It’s so powerful to see that coming from the top, rather than just sort of pointing down saying you are the problem.”

2. Trust Is Huge
Supporting Quote
Amy Woodall: “Being really open, honest, authentic, and vulnerable doesn’t mean weak. It means that you’re willing to say, ‘Hey look, I might need some help with this, and I don’t have all of the answers.’ That’s a great way to develop trust. All of those things, though, in this equation are divided by a very important factor, which is our self orientation. So the more we make it about us and our agenda and what’s in it for our best interest, the more that trust work goes down. And so when we’re working with these leaders, it’s really about how do you put ego aside so that you can show up differently for your team and therefore develop trust?”

3. Dealing With Difficult People
Supporting Quote
Amy Woodall: “The first step in learning how to deal with difficult people is knowing what pushes your buttons. The first part of the training is that identification and then also understanding that other people don’t know where your buttons lie. So if they push them, it’s typically accidental, and no one else owns them but us. And I know that that can seem soft, but ultimately that’s some of the greatest takeaways that we hear from organizations is wow, just this ownership over how I’m showing up, regardless of how other people behave is really empowering for people, and when people feel empowered, you get better results.”

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Monday Fire Takeover: Showing Up Courageously with Rosie Ward

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. This episode is getting taken over by Rosie Ward, CEO and Co-founder of Salveo Partners. Listen in as she shares how we can show up courageously.

Follow to get your Monday Fired up.

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117: Extraordinary Leaders are ATV | Todd Palmer

Todd Palmer is a coach to entrepreneurial CEOs and author of the book, From Suck to Success. He’s a keynote speaker with more than 25 years of experience as an entrepreneur and CEO himself.

In this episode, he describes the life experience that ultimately inspired his book. What’s the key takeaway? ATV — authenticity, transparency and vulnerability. Listen in as Todd describes these characteristics and helps us understand their uniqueness and also where they intersect.

If you’d like a free chapter of Todd’s book, From Suck to Success, simply go to www.fromsucktosuccess.com.

Book Recommendations

Additional Resources

Truth You Can Act On 

1. Evaluate How You Are Posturing 
Supporting Quote
Todd Palmer: “You’ve got to be authentic, transparent, and vulnerable to kick an addiction. You’ve got to work through those things, but pride and ego are such a huge part of our imposter syndrome. You think, I don’t want to show up as my true, authentic self because I don’t think you’re going to like me. The reality is I already don’t like myself and I’m afraid if I’m ATV with you, you won’t like it. The miracle on the other side of it is if I show up as being authentic, transparent, and vulnerable, you’re going to pick up on my genuineness. You’re going to feel a human connection, which will allow us to have greater connectivity. So the imposter syndrome is really a blocker to the kind of activity we really crave from others.”

2. Self-Acceptance Is Key
Supporting Quote
Todd Palmer: “If you want to have an authentic, true life it should drive people to you. Part of it is also accepting yourself. You’re not going to be all things to all people all the time. And that’s okay. That acceptance has to come from first and foremost from within you and that puts it out into the world.”

3. Practice Leaning into Difficult Conversations
Supporting Quote
Todd Palmer: “I had a leader who really had to lean into not shying away from difficult conversations. He had two people on his leadership team that were not executing the job, and he had a real struggle with holding them accountable. Part of the mechanism for him was that nice people don’t fire others. That was his internal dialogue. We had to really work through that and lean into, not away from, uncomfortable conversations. We then were able to implement that feedback and walk away with a very clear accountability.”

4. Get Good at Listening
Supporting Quote
Todd Palmer: “There are 7 million more jobs in the United States than there are people for them. Double down on further data points, the Bureau of Labor and Statistics indicates that we’re at full employment in the United States right around hovering around the 4% mark by the end of the year. They’re predicting it to be about 3.2%. Add in millennials who are at over 11% unemployment rate. So, if you’re a company that has had Gen-Xs or Baby Boomers as they’re retiring or transitioning out of your company, you think millennials are going to replace them. They’re not. Lastly, we are at a labor participation number that is the lowest it’s been in 52 years. So all the data points to it’s a candidate controlled. So, for the employers who are listening, who are trying to lowball people and wages, stop doing it and listen.”

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Monday Fire: You’ve Got One Shot

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you seize the moment?

Follow to get your Monday Fired up.

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Performa Subseries: Deliberate Design of Workplace Experience | Craig Dickman

Craig Dickman is the Managing Director at TitletownTech, a venture capital organization that empowers, supports, and invests in entrepreneurs throughout their startup journey.

For this subseries, Nikki has partnered with Performa, a purpose-driven, fully integrated architecture, engineering and design firm that gives people (and purpose) the space to thrive. In this episode, Craig, Nikki, and co-host Brian Netzel of Performa discuss deliberate design of the workplace experience and making purposeful leadership decisions. 

Book Recommendations

Additional Resources

Truth You Can Act On 

1. Be Deliberate in Your Leadership Strategy
Supporting Quote
Craig Dickman: “In one of the companies I founded and ran for about 15 years I used to keep track of how many people we hired or asked to join the organization when we had no job for it. Instead of going out and saying, ‘Hey, I want a director of finance, here’s her job description. Let’s go find that person.’ We kind of adopted a strategy that said, ‘You know what? We know who we are as an organization, and when we meet someone that we think would make us better, someone who would represent some of those underlying values and some of that sense of purpose, we would invite them into the organization.’ And then once they were in the organization, we would figure out what they wanted to do. There were times that as many as a third of the people in the company that I was operating were hired more because of who they were and what excited them than the skill set they had or what they were going to be asked to do inside our organization, but we were deliberate in doing so to empower our organization.”

2. Plan Time to “Be”
Supporting Quote
Craig Dickman:  “Our team starts every week by getting together with no agenda. We don’t follow a script. We don’t say we’re going to cover these three things. We’re not saying we’re going to come together and figure out what our agenda is for the week. It’s not any of those things. Our focus is coming together and discussing whatever’s on the minds of the people who are there, ultimately, which is going to influence the work that’s being done.”

3. Create Gaps
Supporting Quote
Craig Dickman: “Breakthroughs don’t occur when you’re working on something intently. When you’re trying to hit a deadline, when you’re trying to solve a complex problem, you’ve gotta be working on it. Then you’ve got a great gaps, both as an individual and as an organization, and so I make sure that I create and try to make sure that the organization does create gaps after we’ve worked on something that’s significant and intense where we might not have developed an answer or a consensus. That way we can come back and it’s almost like I’ve got a great idea in the shower kind of concept. lIt’s about bringing that deliberately into an organization and creating gaps, because I really do believe that’s when some of the real thought breakthroughs can happen”

4. Consider Co-creating Dream Jobs
Supporting Quote
Craig Dickman: “I wasn’t expecting to interview anyone that day for a job that I wasn’t looking for, and yet we found ourselves sitting across the table and I remember saying, ‘Okay, so we don’t have a job for you, but tell me, if you could do anything you want to do, what would it be? What would be your dream job?’  And she went through and identified, ‘I’d love to do this. I’ve always wanted to do this. In my last job, I did this. I didn’t like it.’ And she went through and kind of shared some of the things she was looking for. Then I said, ‘Okay, well in our organization. Here’s some things that we kind of need. Here’s some things that we don’t.’ And I went through my list trying to be as transparent as she was. And then we said, okay, now that we both know a little bit about each other and what we do and don’t like. If we put these together, what would it look like? And so, we literally had a blank piece of paper and used it to create a role inside an organization.”

 

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Monday Fire Takeover: Be Curious with Tim Spiker

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Tim Spiker is taking over this episode with a message of how to be more inwardly sound and others focused.

Follow to get your Monday Fired up and hear more from Tim as he launches his own podcast on the PeopleForward Network.

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Throwback: Workplace Gamification | Rebecca Metter

Rebecca Metter is the CEO of Wambi, LLC, a digital healthcare employee recognition platform that improves patient satisfaction and safety. It’s the first gamified system that significantly increases employee engagement.

In this throwback episode, Nikki revisits her conversation with Rebecca, a CEO whose mission is to create meaningful interactions between people as a way to create real and lasting change.

Book Recommendations

Additional Resources

Truth You Can Act On 

1. Start with the End in Mind
Supporting Quote
Rebecca Metter: “The number one most important thing to figure out before developing the strategy itself is to kind of take a step back and ask yourself, ‘Why am I doing this? Why do I think I need to use gamification here? What am I trying to achieve?’ After you figure out what you want to drive in terms of a change for your organization, then the strategy really can set in. If this is the outcome I want to achieve, what is meaningful to the people who are going to be critical in actually getting to this result, and how can I incentivize them and recognize them and get some of their competitive juices flowing to be able to really get them to change and making moves in the direction of where I want them to go?”

2. Make the Mundane Fun
Supporting Quote
Rebecca Metter: “I think what’s really great about gamification is that it’s a way to make some things that can be typically mundane more fun. And fun is something that I think we underestimate a lot in the workplace. Fun is extremely critical to the success of our businesses. I think fun has been a word that people would be like, do we really need fun in the workplace? Well, the answer is yes, we do. And not just with millennials, with all generations, it’s important. That’s really where people can kind of let go, allow their creative juices to start flowing, and be able to connect with others. And that connection is so very important.”

3. Ensure Key Stakeholders are Involved at All Levels
Supporting Quote
Rebecca Metter: “Adoption really comes down to change management and being able to really figure out who are the key stakeholders that are going to need to be engaged from day one? How am I going to engage them? And then how are they going to be able to relay my message to their teams? I think one of the things that we do a lot in organizations is we have a really cool idea, we decide we’re going to deploy it, but then for some reason, the person who’s the most critical, and is leading the way. The team that is going to be impacted by the particular initiative is not brought in until they’re told, Hey, we’re doing this now. Let’s roll it out. Well, that’s way too late. So, bringing people into the conversation early on is really important. Allowing people to have some level of design control and input early on is going to help to not just get folks engaged and to adopt it, but also to craft a gamification strategy that’s really going to work.

4. Be Careful on Competition
Supporting Quote
Rebecca Metter: “It’s all about thinking how can we kind of share that performance across our team in a meaningful way that’s going to encourage them to continue to do better without creating competition at a level where they will feel uncomfortable. So being really careful around sort of this concept of leaderboards and things like that, that’s something we have a lot of sensitivity to at Wambi, but being able to allow people to feel good about their work and to be able to continue to kind of promote them to do great work, that’s the most important thing. We don’t want to promote too intense of a competition within team members that certainly would be sort of counteracting the initial intent.”

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