Podcast

Monday Fire: You Deserve a Fired Up Life

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you fire up your life?

Follow to get your Monday Fired up.

 

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Healthcare Series: Cultivating a Culture of Diversity and Inclusion | Ophelia Byers

Ophelia Byers is the VP and Chief Nursing Officer at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. She has more than 20 years of leadership experience, and in this episode, she discusses her passion: racism-related stress in the workplace. 

Listen as Ophelia shares moving stories of employees who have had such experiences and what leaders should be doing to gain awareness on this problem.

Book Recommendations: 

Sponsor Resources

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Assume We All Have the Opportunity to Sharpen Awareness
Supporting Quote
Ophelia Byers: “There is not always the awareness of what someone’s lived experience is at work. Our obligation is to do some vision correction, and that comes through awareness. It comes through learning and self-study. It comes through a variety of ways, but we have to first recognize that we do not see all and that we really need diverse perspectives from a diverse group of individuals to be able to be more aware.”

2. Identify Risks and Challenges to Prioritize Focus for Change
Supporting Quote
Ophelia Byers: “When we think about quality, we first think there are roadblocks. There are potential problems. There are actual problems. So first, it starts with problem identification or risk identification. That’s important, and that’s where that awareness comes in. Let’s all just assume that there’s an opportunity to dig deeper, think more expansively. So, in that risk identification or problem identification, you’re thinking about what are your employees going through. What are the safety risks? What are the adverse events or near misses and anyone in healthcare, we certainly understand those terms around the employee experience. Usually, we do it around patient safety, but let’s do it around the psychological safety of our employees.”

3. Diversity and Inclusion Is a Process
Supporting Quote
Ophelia Byers: “There should be a process to this. What we don’t want to do is treat diversity as something that, if we have multicultural potlucks or have “Wear Your Ethnic Attire to Work” day, or just have the crucial conversations around diversity. Those are all wonderful things that can certainly boost morale, but beyond boosting morale, what does structural change look like? And so making sure that there is a methodical approach to this, which this quality management approach can help improve, by taking all the information that we’ve gleaned and putting together an improvement process. Organized healthcare organizations are very familiar with processes, like plan, do, study, but really taking out some higher level themes and starting to say, okay, this is what we need to work on.”

4. Constantly Evaluate Your Organization’s Diversity
Supporting Quote
Ophelia Byers: “It’s continuing to have those dialogues to check back, continuing to monitor if our interventions have been effective. How are they landing with people? Is what we hope to achieve actually occurring? And it’s circling back to people that you spoke with to understand if the interventions that were put in place are going as intended. So, it is this self-check process to ensure safety through standardization, to ensure high reliability. And I think that in taking this approach, there’s not one organization that doesn’t understand quality. And so making diversity and inclusion about quality of care, not only for the customer, but also for the internal customer, for our employees, is a great way to promote structural change.”

 

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Monday Fire Takeover: Six things to say INSTEAD of “stop crying” with Andrea Butcher

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Andrea Butcher, President of HRD Advisory Group, takes over this episode to share other ways to respond to a team member experiencing emotion. Here we go!

To hear more from Andrea, check out her podcast Being [at Work] and listen to the Daily Dose episodes.

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112: Create a Culture that Helps All Generations Thrive | Blake Behr

Blake Behr, President of Ridgeline Electrical Industries, believes in creating a culture where all employees can flourish no matter their age and generation. Because of this, Ridgeline has a 4% employee turnover rate.

In this episode Blake explains how culture is the environment for growth, connection, fulfillment, and thriving. Listen as he shares how he thinks about investing in culture as a leader and what it can do to transform your organization. 

Book Recommendations: 

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Define Culture

Supporting Quote

Blake Behr: “Early on in our company, we were looking at potentially acquiring another company, and we were like, ‘I don’t think this is it. And the reason I don’t think this is a fit is I think our cultures are so different. And the environments that we use here are so different that I just don’t think it’s going to work.’ And one of my partners said, ‘Well, I mean, it’s our company. We’ll just make the culture whatever we want it to be.’ And we had such a heated conversation that finally, he was so frustrated. He was like, ‘Well, what the hell is culture?’ And I was just like, oh, okay. This is where we need to focus first. And so, for us, culture is really just the environment for growth, connection, fulfillment, and thriving.”

2. Everyone Wants Someone to Invest in Them

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Blake Behr: “Especially with these younger generations, they’re looking for someone to come alongside them. I’m pretty sure it was Mark Twain who said that the chief want of man is for someone to come alongside him and help him do what he can. And so we’re all looking for someone to help us on that next step. But I think a lot of times we as leaders and CEOs, we don’t want to invest that time because it’s painful. I hear it’s time-consuming, and it is, but I’m a parent of four kids, and even though it’s time consuming and hard, it’s still enjoyable. It’s still something that we should do. I think it’s spending a ton of time, and I realized as well that this coaching thing is not just a millennial thing and it’s not just the Gen-Z thing. Gen-X and Boomers all want someone to help them do the things they can as well.”

3. Don’t Assume

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Blake Behr: “Coaching is coming alongside people, and as business owners, how often do we say, ‘Well, they’re just lazy. They just don’t do this.’ How do they not know to do this? Because nobody’s taught them. Nobody’s come alongside them and done the work. I promise you, when you invest in that work, I’ve never seen loyalty better. I haven’t, and in an industry where the turnover rate is 43-58% a year, we’re 4% turnover. It’s because the loyalty is so much deeper because the care is there.”

4. Sharpen Your Coaching Skills

Supporting Quote

Blake Behr: “I coach two of my teammates every day through a 30-minute call where we’re digging into the holistic person. It’s coaching and training, and we’ll dig into the technical, but we’ll also dig into the mindsets because, as leaders, we know that we’re not here because we’re really great technicians at what we do. In fact, I’m very average. But we’re really good at having mindsets and seeing bigger pictures and being able to adjust to things. And I think that’s where I want to help in coaching is overcome certain mindset hurdles. Make sure we’re not a fixed mindset environment, but we’re in a growth mindset. So, a lot of the coaching is focused there, and sometimes it takes a long time.”

Monday Fire Takeover: A good way to gauge your response – ask yourself if it’s helpful with Andrea Butcher

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Andrea Butcher, President of HRD Advisory Group, takes over this episode to share better ways to gauge your responses to others. Here we go!

To hear more from Andrea, check out her podcast Being [at Work] and listen to the Daily Dose episodes.

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Healthcare Series: The Climb to Destigmatizing Mental Health | Nigel Girgrah

Nigel Girgrah is the Chief Wellness Officer at Ochsner Health System where he strives to illustrate vulnerability and destigmatize mental health in the workplace.

During the pandemic, there was an increase in mental health needs. While mental health isn’t anything new, leaders are constantly having to adapt to new situations and environments.  In this episode, listen as Nigel shares how he and his team prioritize mental health awareness, destigmatization, and develop resources to help their employees perform at their best. 

Book Recommendations 

Sponsor Resources

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Get a Collective A-game
Supporting Quote
Nigel Girgrah: “There’s really no industry more complex than healthcare. As I think about it, in order to meet the challenges associated with healthcare reform, we need the collective of our healthcare workers to achieve great things. I look at wellbeing in the workplace as a vehicle to get there and burnouts are kind of an existential threat to achieving those goals.”

2. Remove Barriers
Supporting Quote
Nigel Girgrah: “Getting back to the need to de-stigmatize mental health,  I think there are two components to that. One is really creating a belief system that it’s okay to come forward. The second component is we have to remove barriers. I go back to SARS one in Toronto. Some of the good things that seem to happen from that is licensing agencies sort of removing explicit questions about mental health from license renewals. Credentialing boards for removing specific questions about mental health. It’s one thing to sort of say, ‘Hey, believe it. It’s okay.’ But if we send messages every year that say, ‘Tell me if you have a history of mental health.’ That sort of just creates confusion.”

3. Remember Your Strategy
Supporting Quote
Nigel Girgrah: “Pre-COVID, the office I lead had a pretty solid evidence-based wellbeing strategy that was just focused at that time on our physicians and our advanced practice providers. It was heavily focused on things like practice efficiency, promoting advanced team-based care, and developing our leaders because these were the things that appeared to drive professional fulfillment the most, and resilience is a part of that.”

4. Practice Vulnerability
Supporting Quote
Nigel Girgrah: “Everybody has their own story, but people probably aren’t prepared to come forward with this story. I sent an open letter in September to all 30,000 employees that was entitled: ‘How are you really?’ I talked about myself. I talked about the mental health stigma in healthcare, and the reception was overwhelming. It was the most read executive message that had been sent out. And it wasn’t just people reading it. There were two-page email responses. It really seemed to resonate, and I say that because vulnerability precedes trust.”

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Monday Fire Takeover: First, Lead Yourself with Andrea Butcher

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Andrea Butcher, President of HRD Advisory Group, takes over this episode to remind us to first lead ourselves before we can lead others. Here we go!

To hear more from Andrea, check out her podcast Being [at Work] and listen to the Daily Dose episodes.

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Throwback: Attitude: The Foundation to Success | Mark Schulman

In this special bonus episode of Gut+Science, Nikki revisits her interview with Mark Schulman, the drummer for P!nk and rockstar keynote speaker. In this episode, he dives into why attitude is the ultimate power – and how you can shift not only your attitude but the attitudes of others.

“Understanding that you, as a leader, have the power to drive different behavior and actually produce different results is truly powerful,” he says.

Listen in as this rockstar drummer explains why “A times B equals C” when it comes to attitude, behavior, and consequence.

Truth You Can Act On: 

  1. We Can Shift Our Attitude in Minutes. Get cut off in traffic? Did an incident at work or at home get you down? Take a few minutes to list out the things you’re grateful for in life. Gratitude is the foundation to shifting your attitude. 
  2. Attitude Times Behavior Equals Consequence. Reflect on this in your current life scenario. Enhance your life by working on your attitude and behaviors. 
  3. As a Leader, Be Real. The way to be real? Be you! Relationships influence employee engagement so be authentic when it comes to interacting with your people.

Book Recommendation: 

The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google by Scott Galloway

112: Hierarchy of Employee Needs | O’Brien McMahon

O’Brien McMahon is a Senior Vice President with Lockton, where he helps companies build better total rewards programs including employee benefits, compensation, and retirement programs. He also hosts a podcast called “People Business” that explores human behavior and helps people get the most out of themselves and the people around them.

In this episode, O’Brien talks about the importance of prioritizing employee needs and what leaders should be thinking about to effectively drive results. 

Book Recommendations

Monday Fire Takeover: Own Your Day with Andrea Butcher

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Andrea Butcher, President of HRD Advisory Group, takes over this episode with a reminder to own your mindset and your day. Here we go!

To hear more from Andrea, check out her podcast Being [at Work] and listen to the Daily Dose episodes.

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