Podcast

Monday Fire Takeover: Why Work? 4 Principles of Connection with Jason Cochran

Hello again, everyone! This is Jason Cochran with Dulead.

Do you ever wonder why humans work in the first place? Yes, we all need a certain amount of money to do things, but that’s not at the core of why we get up in the morning to offer our best efforts most days. And it’s not because of perks either. In their book, The Why of Work, Wendy and Dave Ulrich state that people find meaning when they see a clear connection between what they highly value and what they spend time doing.

So it turns out we really aren’t that complicated. We’re all hard-wired to desire meaningful, purpose-driven work. Leaders – this is why we need to get ridiculously simple in order to become more effective with our people strategies. And the 4 Principles of Connection model I helped create gets to the core reasons for why people want to work and offer their best.

The 4 Principles of Connection™️  model focuses on healthy connections to self, others, role, and the organization. And there’s a core rhythm of employee and leadership experiences which help strengthen these connections leading to #fulfillment, #meaning, and #purpose from the work people do.

Let’s briefly go through each principle and some example experiences for each:

Principle #1 – Connecting to Self:

  •  People want to work for organizations that help them develop as a whole person – not just in the rote skills of their job
    • Examples:
      • Dream Manager programs
      • 20% Autonomous time
      • Pursuing and achieving goals
      • Wellness programs
      • Encourage personal branding

Principle #2 – Connecting to Others:  

  • People want to work where they’re accepted for their authentic selves and where they experience a level of connection with the leadership and their team that creates strong bonds
    • Examples:
      • Mentor programs
      • Onboarding experiences
      • Frequent, meaningful recognition and appreciation
      • Essential Skills Coaching (Empathy, Humility, Emotional Intelligence)

Principle #3 – Connecting to Role:  

  • People want to work where there’s clarity around their role and importance in the ecosystem and that their contributions matter
    • Examples:
      • Stay Interviews
      • Advancement Paths
      • Opportunities for Professional Development
      • Role mapping including target behaviors and alignment plans
      • Special projects

Principle #4 – Connecting to the Organization:  

  • People want to work where they know the greater whole, of which they’re a part, is doing important work in the world – especially their own communities
    • Examples:
      • North Star/Core Identity
      • Service projects
      • Employee Stock Ownership Programs
      • Diversity, Equity and Inclusion experiences

And here’s the beautiful part of the 4 Principles of Connection. It isn’t just the right thing to do for your people – it’s the smart thing to do for your organization. In doing so you’re moving the levers which drive employee engagement, hone your culture, and strengthen your employer brand.

Bear in mind, the most important customers are your internal ones…your employees. It all starts with them. They decide every day whether they’re bought into the organization and what it stands for and the work that is accomplished.

So leaders – let’s make things ridiculously simple and focus on the levers that matter – the 4 Principles of Connection. When you get it right for your people, they get it right for the organization and the external customers.

Let’s go forth and nurture these healthy connections in your organizations!

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Healthcare Series: Practicing Intentional Leadership in a Virtual World | Dr. Scott Rissmiller

Dr. Scott Rissmiller is the Executive Vice President and Chief Physician Executive for Atrium Health, an integrated nonprofit health system with 42 hospitals and over 1500 care locations.

Scott is passionate about people and culture, which manifests itself into the way he interacts with his team. In this episode Scott shares insights on how Atrium Health has supported employees and patients during the COVID crisis, as well as small practices you can utilize to help make intentional leadership a part of our daily routine. 

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Fail Fast
Supporting Quote:
Dr. Scott Rissmiller: “I believe the culture we had put in place allowed our teams to come together rather than fragment and allowed them to focus on the patient and really work together. There was trust there that we were going to do everything we could to take care of them and to take care of our patients at the end of the day. And I’m also a big believer in setting the direction, putting up some wide guard rails, and then getting out of the way to let our leaders lead and make decisions. Sometimes we’re going to make mistakes. That’s okay. Learn from it, move on, dust off, and let’s get back at it.”

2. Practice Intentional Leadership
Supporting Quote
Dr. Scott Rissmiller: “When we’re in person, we can read body language better, and we can see people’s expressions. You miss that in virtual calls, so you really have to double down on being real and really demonstrating and showing that you care. We have really focused on making sure in our meetings that we are checking in on each other. We’re asking those sensitive questions that might connect in different ways with people and really focusing on giving that encouragement and positive feedback because people are isolated. They want to do really good work, but they don’t have the interaction that they normally have that gives them that reward. So really double down on the positive feedback and encouragement.”

3. Over Communicate
Supporting Quote
Dr. Scott Rissmiller: “Over communicate. You cannot over communicate. So when you think you’re ever communicating, do it more and do it multimodal, whether it be virtual or emails or other things, make sure it’s consistent, and make sure it’s frequent.”

4. Share Authentic Stories of Impact
Supporting Quote
Dr. Scott Rissmiller: “It’s even more important today for leaders to show up with positive energy and optimism while we tackle these tough problems. And be real, just like with our courageous conversations, don’t shy away from the things that might be a bit uncomfortable, because again, in this time of virtual, it’s easy to just stay at the surface level. Dig deep, make it consistent, and build people up. Then connect back to why we went into this to begin with. There is a practice that is just incredible, which is called connect the purpose, where we start every meeting, and I mean every meeting, with a patient story of how we have delivered incredible care, and what we meant to that patient.”

Book Recommendations:

Sponsors Resources:

  • Wambi.org Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.
  • HCAHPS Case Study – Learn how University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health used Wambi to improve employee engagement and patient experience, and found that the Wambi platform is an early predictor of the HCAHPS. Download the case study here.

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Monday Fire: Live a Hell Yes Life

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

What are your foundational phrases?

Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

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108: Eliminating the Ego and Focusing on the Mission | Alex Tyink

Alex Tyink is the President of Fork Farms, a company that believes anybody can be a farmer. They deliver this message by engaging deeply with their customers to help them build strong relationships with fresh food.

While the focus of their company is meaningful connections with customers, Alex is committed to helping his people feel the company mission. 

In this episode Alex shares insights on getting team members to buy into the mission. It’s not easy, but he firmly believes the key to success is making sure everyone feels the impact of their own work.

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Hire Right
Supporting Quote:
Alex Tyink:  “I think it’s more of a practice personally than it is a silver bullet. I think for us, it starts with the hire. I think when we hire the right people that fit the culture, fit the energy that we’re trying to build, that have the collaboration potential, you know, that gets you a fair amount of the way. I think I’ve found when you don’t have that, it’s really more of an uphill battle.”

2. Eliminate the Ego
Supporting Quote
Alex Tyink: “It’s training up the leaders that we’re lifting up into these different critical roles and helping them understand that this is the way they’re going to be able to drive the most impact through the organization. It’s not about ego and who reports to who. It’s really about what’s best for the company, what’s best for the mission, and what’s best for the entire team. I think building a culture around humility and consciousness of our own ego, it’s tough to do, but those are some of the toughest conversations that I think we’ve had with our people.”

3. Focus on Employee Wellbeing 
Supporting Quote
Alex Tyink: “For us, consciously stepping back, looking at what results we’re trying to drive, and reminding ourselves the key activities we really believe are going to drive those results, and making sure that we’re really prioritized in the right place. I think it can be really healthy to have resets periodically where it’s okay for the team to shift course a little bit and to make sure that they redirect and reprioritize their energy. Those resets, I think, can be refreshing and they can make sure that the team stays connected to the mission.”

 

Book Recommendation:

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Monday Fire Takeover: The Definition of Optimism with Dr. Renee Thompson

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. In this episode, CEO & Founder of Healthy Workforce InstituteDr. Renee Thompson, takes over to give some advice. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you redefine optimism?

Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

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Monday Fire Takeover: Changing Your Environment with Dr. Renee Thompson

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. In this episode, CEO & Founder of Healthy Workforce InstituteDr. Renee Thompson, takes over to give some advice. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you change your environment from negative to positive?

Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

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Monday Fire Takeover: The Negativity Bias with Dr. Renee Thompson

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. In this episode, CEO & Founder of Healthy Workforce Institute, Dr. Renee Thompson, takes over to give some advice. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you be deliberate about acknowledging the positive?

Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

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Monday Fire: Reason. Season. Lifetime.

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you live more fully and intentionally?

Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

 

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[Throwback] Healthcare Series: Building a Mission Employees Follow | Steve Long

Steve Long is the President and CEO of Hancock Regional Hospital, where he has helped develop a unique culture of inspired and engaged employees. Before taking over at Hancock, he served for 20 years in various healthcare leadership roles across the country.

The motto at Hancock Hospital is, “What a blessing it is to work in a place where we love people for a living.” This motto, coupled with their goal to be nationally recognized for kindness, has created a special culture of caring; A culture that is so tangible, you can actually feel the difference as you walk through the doors.

In this throwback episode, Nikki revists the conversation she had with Steve about creating a mission employees want to follow. Steve is a strong believer in creating and living by a core mission statement, in both your organization and in your personal life. To find your personal mission, ask yourself: what kind of legacy do you want to leave?

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Hire the Right People
Supporting Quote:
Steve Long: “This is why we hire for just the right kind of folks, because it comes from that intrinsic sense of ownership, that intrinsic sense that I have a part to play here. So we make sure that we hire for that. Again, it gets down to the attitude. It’s the difference between a person that sees a piece of trash in the corner of a room or on the edge of a hallway and walks by it and says, ‘Well, I sure hope that the person whose job is to pick it up, comes and picks that up.’ Then compared to a person who says, ‘Wow, I really don’t want our place to look like it’s not clean, so I’m going to stop and pick it up and throw it away.’ That’s the difference, and that’s what we look for as we hire people — the ones that are going to reach down, pick it up, and throw it away.”

2. Track Goals and Progress 
Supporting Quote
Steve Long: “We look at our goals and our objectives. We program ourselves to look at outcomes. For example, have we seen a measurable improvement in patient safety? Have we seen an improvement in patient experience scores? And it’s not about did I walk through the unit four times in the last week? That’s an activity. What we actually measure and what we hold ourselves accountable for are the outcomes, and we do that because we have built an incentive plan that is actually organization-wide. We have both organization-wide incentive plans, and we have department-level incentive plans, and they’re also based on these outcomes.”

3. Build Employee Ownership 
Supporting Quote: 
Steve Long: “I was building a house, and as I was framing it up, my boss, who was a physician, a very busy leader in academic medicine, came over to my place on a Saturday and he spent half a day cutting boards for my house. I was so impressed that he cared enough about me, that he would take time out of his very, very busy schedule on a weekend to come and help me work on my house. Because he did that and he showed that he cared about me, my loyalty to him and my desire to do the things that we needed to do as an organization, really were a result of his investment in me.” 

Book Recommendation:

Sponsors:

  • Wambi.org Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Monday Fire Takeover: Team Meetings with Vicki Hess

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Today, employee engagement expert Vicki Hess takes over to give some advice. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you make your team meetings more valuable?

Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

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