Healthcare

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[Throwback] Healthcare Series: Building a Mission Employees Follow | Steve Long

Steve Long is the President and CEO of Hancock Regional Hospital, where he has helped develop a unique culture of inspired and engaged employees. Before taking over at Hancock, he served for 20 years in various healthcare leadership roles across the country.

The motto at Hancock Hospital is, “What a blessing it is to work in a place where we love people for a living.” This motto, coupled with their goal to be nationally recognized for kindness, has created a special culture of caring; A culture that is so tangible, you can actually feel the difference as you walk through the doors.

In this throwback episode, Nikki revists the conversation she had with Steve about creating a mission employees want to follow. Steve is a strong believer in creating and living by a core mission statement, in both your organization and in your personal life. To find your personal mission, ask yourself: what kind of legacy do you want to leave?

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Hire the Right People
Supporting Quote:
Steve Long: “This is why we hire for just the right kind of folks, because it comes from that intrinsic sense of ownership, that intrinsic sense that I have a part to play here. So we make sure that we hire for that. Again, it gets down to the attitude. It’s the difference between a person that sees a piece of trash in the corner of a room or on the edge of a hallway and walks by it and says, ‘Well, I sure hope that the person whose job is to pick it up, comes and picks that up.’ Then compared to a person who says, ‘Wow, I really don’t want our place to look like it’s not clean, so I’m going to stop and pick it up and throw it away.’ That’s the difference, and that’s what we look for as we hire people — the ones that are going to reach down, pick it up, and throw it away.”

2. Track Goals and Progress 
Supporting Quote
Steve Long: “We look at our goals and our objectives. We program ourselves to look at outcomes. For example, have we seen a measurable improvement in patient safety? Have we seen an improvement in patient experience scores? And it’s not about did I walk through the unit four times in the last week? That’s an activity. What we actually measure and what we hold ourselves accountable for are the outcomes, and we do that because we have built an incentive plan that is actually organization-wide. We have both organization-wide incentive plans, and we have department-level incentive plans, and they’re also based on these outcomes.”

3. Build Employee Ownership 
Supporting Quote: 
Steve Long: “I was building a house, and as I was framing it up, my boss, who was a physician, a very busy leader in academic medicine, came over to my place on a Saturday and he spent half a day cutting boards for my house. I was so impressed that he cared enough about me, that he would take time out of his very, very busy schedule on a weekend to come and help me work on my house. Because he did that and he showed that he cared about me, my loyalty to him and my desire to do the things that we needed to do as an organization, really were a result of his investment in me.” 

Book Recommendation:

Sponsors:

  • Wambi.org Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Healthcare Series: Human Connection | Cassandra Crowe-Jackson

Cassandra Crowe-Jackson is the Chief Experience Officer at Sharp HealthCare with over 20 years of leadership experience in the industry. She is passionate about human connection and its power to create meaningful impact.

In this episode, Cassandra shares her best practices for daily meaningful connection with team members, as well as ways to make the most out of virtual connection.


Truth You Can Act On 

1. Increase Your Visibility
Supporting Quote
Cassandra Crowe-Jackson: “We’ve been talking about leadership visibility, because even our leaders, our executive team, we’ve been told you’re working from home from now on. So how is it that you’re going to be able to connect with your team, especially, you know, in a 24/7environment? So, you know, we do have our entity or facility leadership or the CEOs and the executive teams rounding just to say to that team, ‘Thank you.  I know you’re here.’ Our CEO, as a matter of fact, did midnight rounds at one of our facilities that are more heavily impacted because you think about those nurses and doctors that are working that weekend night shift. They aren’t getting a lot of human connection.”

2. Incorporate Personal Check-in’s 
Supporting Quote
Cassandra Crowe-Jackson: “I’ve had to have a ton of virtual meetings. So when I start my virtual meetings and begin, you know, I always try to find the one question about you. It will be something more of my icebreaker in terms of, ‘What was the best thing that happened to you yesterday?’ Because that kind of stops people for a moment. Because they’re prepared to tell me all about their work and their role and what they can do to help me or what I could do to help them, but when I have taken that pulse and that beat, just to say, ‘What was the best thing that happened to you?’ Or, “What made your day?’ Or, ‘What were three things you were most grateful for yesterday?’ It kind of says, stop a moment and let’s connect here as humans first, and then we can talk business.”

3. Look for the Silver Lining 
Supporting Quote
Cassandra Crowe-Jackson: “Now for every hour of time, you log in that says you exercise, you are contributing one meal. So they’re taking that to mean five hours of walking is one meal for four people or something like that. So it’s again saying, ‘Keep doing what you’re doing, stay healthy, but while you’re staying healthy, you’re going to be helping people eat.’ San Diego has a lot of homelessness and a lot of hungry people, as does everyone in the country, and I can see feedback in the chats about, you know, what people are doing and how they feel connected to purpose still to our, our vision and our mission.”

Book Recommendations

Sponsor

  • Wambi.org – Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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[Throwback] Healthcare Series: Employee Engagement in Healthcare | Vicki Hess

Vicki Hess is an engagement expert, author, thought-leader, and speaker, and she is passionate about inspiring healthcare leaders to take action and transform engagement. 

In this throwback episode, listen in as she and Nikki reveal the tools you need to create the environment you and your employees want to work in.

Learn more about Vicki at vickihess.com.

Truth You Can Act On

1. Make Engagement Part of the Organization’s Strategy 
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “What I see that doesn’t work is when the survey becomes a big push, it becomes like the flavor of the month. And all of the sudden now we’re focusing on the survey and we want everyone to do the survey. And if you turn in your ticket, you’re gonna get a prize. And the managers like, please, please, please take this survey. And Edwards like, oh, whatever, you know, and they take this survey. And the reason they say, oh, whatever is because last year when this happened, the survey results came back. They had the requisite action planning meeting. They all got in a room. They looked at the results. They said what they wanted to have to get better. And then they never heard anything again.”

2. Take Action
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “When somebody says to me, we have a people pillar and it’s an agenda item on every single meeting we have and all of our performance reviews are related to that and et cetera. Then I’m like, they’ve got a strategic connection. So the organizations that do well with sustaining engagement over time, they go from what I call engagement dread where the managers like, oh, I got to talk about the survey and, you know, do an action plan to the engagement thread where you weave engagement into everything that you’re doing. “

3. Make Manager Engagement Skills a Priority 
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “If it’s truly important, it’s got to be part of the strategy. It doesn’t have to be compensation related for leaders, but it definitely has to be some measure of their success has to be related to the engagement levels of their team. The other thing is there’s got to be the tools for training and teaching managers how to be effective, engaging leaders. And it can’t be a flavor of the month.”

4. Right Mindset and Belief Make Strategies Work
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “These unproductive beliefs and mindsets that organizations let thrive, that they let go on are often the cause of disengagement. At an organizational level, then leaders feel helpless. Their mindset might be, but what can I do about this? And then individuals there, their negative mindset as well. It’s somebody else’s job to make me happy at work. And so unless those things are addressed and talked about. Now, the cool thing is we know what the unproductive beliefs are. We just have to be willing to talk about this elephant in the room or the sacred cow.”

Book Recommendation

Sponsor

Wambi.orgWambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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[Throwback] Healthcare Series: Leading with Gratitude from Within | Jill Kersh

Jill Kersh is the Owner of Thrive Unlimited and a certified life and career coach. She has a passion for equipping others to thrive through their own authentic connection to gratitude.

In this episode you will hear Jill discuss  focusing on what you have, not what’s missing, and how you can incorporate different routines in your day to help your gratitude practices.

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Focus on What You Have, Not What’s Missing
Supporting Quotes
Jill Kersh: “When you have a leader that’s grounded in gratitude, they’re focusing on what they have instead of what is missing. They make each employee feel seen and heard and appreciated, which leads to increased morale and decreased turnover.”

Jill Kersh: “When they’re in those negative thoughts, The leader is focusing on what’s missing. Oftentimes they’re using comparison. Avoid comparison; comparison, kills gratitude quicker than anything else.”

2. Gratitude Should Not Be an After-thought
Supporting Quote
Jill Kersh: “It’s a matter of choice. So the organization and a leader has to start from, you know, top down showing gratitude, and then it, honestly, it becomes contagious and everyone under them starts expressing heartfelt gratitude and that team comes together and it really has an incredible impact.”

3. Be Gratitude-focused to See Gifts in Situations and People 
Supporting Quotes
Jill Kersh: “These leaders have the ability to increase their success and  the success of those around them, they can see a gift in every negative situation. With their perspective of gratitude turned on and zoned in this often leads employees to flourish in the worst of times.”

Jill Kersh: “A leader that leads with gratitude instead of thinking, ‘Whoa is me’ in that situation, –which the team follows their feeling, by the way– they have that ability to go, “Gosh, what is the gift in this experience? How can we come out stronger and better than we ever have?” And when they start doing that, they start a conversation with their team that leads to brainstorming and creativity so that the company comes out stronger and better than if the mishap hadn’t happened. They choose to learn from every experience.”

4. Start Each Day and Conversation with Intention
Supporting Quote
Jill Kersh: “When we start coming from those places where we’re asking things like that, and we’re saying prayers, and we’re coming from appreciation  to start our days with intention, we instantly get to a better place…and as soon as you start thinking about what you’re learning from the experience, you instantly start moving into a place of gratitude.”

5. Adopt Daily Rituals for Gratitude Practice.
Supporting Quotes
Jill Kersh: “People that have these gratitude practices daily, so those core leaders have a hundred percent of people feeling more joy around them. 84% felt reduced stress and depression, 80% experienced more energy, and they were able to create optimism.”

Jill Kersh: “Gratitude instantly connects you to everything else. So when they’re leading from gratitude, they’re more connected to their employees, their friends, their families, they’re very connected to their missions and their life purpose.”

Book Recommendation:

Sponsor

Wambi.org Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Healthcare Series: Building a Culture of Pride | Brian Helleland and Mary Ann Perez

Brian Helleland, CEO, and Mary Ann Perez, Director of Care Experience work at St. Jude Medical Center in Southern California. While they have different roles in the company, both are passionate about nurturing pride for their organization.

In this episode Brian and Mary Ann speak to the importance of training and how it is the job of a leader to make culture tangible.

Truth You Can Act On

1. Own Culture Initiatives
Supporting Quote
Brian Helleland: “We’re not shy about talking about hashtag St. Jude pride or the St. Jude pride campaign. We’re transparent about it. We’re not trying to manipulate or trick anybody that we’re creating this culture to make people happy to be here. We want our staff to be part of generating the pride and that we’re all building this pride together. Not that we’re trying to build it as leaders.”

2. Share Positive Stories
Supporting Quote
Mary Ann Perez: “I saw a lot of stories from our own caregivers with photos, maybe of a poster that a community member had left out in one of our parking areas. And just every time the caregiver posts, at the end they have #StJudePride. It’s not just the organization saying how important St.Jude pride is, but our own caregivers recognizing it and feeling it themselves. They don’t feel like they can tell a story of St. Jude without including the hashtag St. Jude pride.”

3. Be Human-Centered
Supporting Quotes
Mary Ann Perez: “We have an applause program, which actually generates about a thousand to 1400 per quarter of recognitions that come from patients and families. They go from caregiver to caregiver, from physicians. In addition, we have an online recognition form where we receive recognitions again from caregiver to caregiver, in addition to online stories. Another mechanism we have in place is our daily huddles, and our daily huddles occur in every department every day, and we highlight a different caregiver’s story.”

Brian Helleland: “One of the other things that I use as a metric is how many of your caregivers do you know by name? Executives are embarrassed sometimes to go around and talk to people and are afraid to introduce themselves because they may not know the caregiver by name or the employee by name, and I’m like, that’s fine. Go out in another couple of days and go out, and when you didn’t know 50 people’s names, maybe the next time you don’t know 30 people’s names. And at some point in time, you’re going to know almost everybody’s names, but those there’s little things to just get over on employee relations and be a relationship driven organization.”

4. Make Your Rounds
Supporting Quote
Brian Helleland:  “It starts with the leadership. You’ve got to invest, not just money, but you’ve got to invest time. You’ve got to walk the halls and talk to people. I tell our leadership all the time. If rounding is not your favorite part of the day, you’re doing something wrong.”

Book Recommendations

Sponsor

Wambi.orgWambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Healthcare Series: Using Reflection to Recharge | Maureen Fagan

Dr. Maureen Fagan is the Chief Nursing Executive at University of Miami Health System in Miami, FL. She is passionate about leading resilience and helping people recharge. 

In this episode, Maureen recounts her leadership journey this year on the frontlines of healthcare and shares best practices to help employees find their “reserves”. 

Truth You Can Act On 

1. Listen to Hear and Empathize 
Supporting Quotes

Maureen Fagan: “You see an executive that’s on the floor in what we would call the trenches. That’s our slang for being on the unit and seeing the patients and meeting the patients and hearing their stories, and I can see that when I do that nursing leadership in the end, the nurses on the frontline that are their staff step back and listen to me. They listened to me talking to the patient. And when I’m talking with the patient, I’m cognizant of the fact that I’m modeling the behavior, that I would like them to have the comportment of what I would like them to be providing.”

Maureen Fagan: “You’re staying on point with what the patient is explained to you. And if the patient is sad about, um, having gotten COVID and they just couldn’t believe it, and that they didn’t think it would happen to them, you’re obviously saying, ‘I’m so sorry that this happened to you.’ You’re being able to meet them where they are at this moment. So what you’re doing is focusing the negative mindset that the patient is in currently, and then you’re saying, in your mind, ‘How am I actually going to be focusing on something positive?’ So you’re taking that mindset, that negative mindset, and giving it the reframe that we talked about to something positive.”

2. Don’t Take the Bait
Supporting Quote

Maureen Fagan: “I think if you reflect back and use the lens of objectivity, you know, I know I got triggered by when he, or she said this or that. And then that made me do what? I tell my staff, and I’ve told myself this for years, don’t take the bait when something is happening right there. There might be somebody that you’re having a conversation with and it’s becoming provocative for some reason, and you want to make a point. I think if you actually respond back with, ‘Well, you know, I think that because ___,’, that actually just cascades. And so when you’re looking back on this after the event is over or the conversation is over, I think when you reflect back that begins your process of how you restore and rejuvenate yourself based on your reflection.”

3. Take Time to Recharge
Supporting Quote

Maureen Fagan: “Part of my self-care is when I get home, I am quiet for a solid hour. I don’t watch television. I don’t read. I sit outside and I think sitting outside, no matter what the temperature is, if you’re dressed the right way to be able to actually breathe without your mask outside, without anyone else being around you is a saving grace in this pandemic.”

4. Have Energizing Talks
Supporting Quotes

Maureen Fagan: “One of the things we like to do is to come on [Zoom] a little bit earlier and just chat it up. That’s been fun because whoever is on early, you get to say hello to and talk about other things, too. And when the new folks come on, you can see them come on before they actually come on. So, if you’re already talking, the other person realizes, ‘Oh, you know, I really want to talk to these people, too.’ And now we have another two minutes before we’re actually going to start the Zoom. So I find that a lot of fun.”

Maureen Fagan: “I think to be, to be a little silly changes the energy in a room and to be silly with, um, without hurting someone’s feelings. So silly stays in a realm of being funny and being childlike in its environment. And that is a very high energy field to be like that it’s like singing, singing is another very high energy field that you can capture. But silliness does that too.”

Book Recommendations

Sponsor

  • Wambi.orgWambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Healthcare Series: A Culture Philosophy in 5 S’s | Bernie McGuinness

This episode of Gut+Science Healthcare is a throwback to a guest Bernie McGuinness, Chief Executive Officer at Majestic Care. The business specializes in community-based skilled nursing throughout Indiana, including short-term rehabilitation, long-term care, and memory care. With more than 20 years of experience in senior healthcare management, Bernie understands the inherent stresses of the modern-day healthcare professional.

You’ll hear Bernie share how he fosters a “culture first, people first” organization and his desire to develop emotional ownership for his care team members. He also breaks down his “Five S’s” strategy; a system that empowers people to take big ideas and turn them into daily strategies for sustainable and prolonged growth.


Truth You Can Act On – The 5 S’s

1. Shine
First impressions make incredible impacts. Continued impressions create expectations. What does your physical work environment say about your culture? Set a high priority on fostering a clean and inspiring environment to demonstrate the value of your employees.

2. Smile 
Turnover is high in many industries, including healthcare. Don’t overlook or undervalue the basic need of all employees: to feel welcomed and appreciated. A warm greeting manifests a winning culture of people-first.

3. Start Strong 
Start each and every day out strongly. Promote the importance of employees arriving and starting their tasks on time. Start every meeting exactly when scheduled. These daily acknowledgments of respect fuel a culture of success.

4. Swagger
A confident employee shouldn’t be a random anomaly. Confidence stems from a deep understanding of not only internal products but also dynamics within your industry. Strive for swagger by providing your employees with tools to be informed and engaged.

5. Show Off
It’s easier for management to take pride in what they do, as they tend to see the bigger picture of how all of the moving parts come together. Foster this sense of pride and ownership within your workforce by promoting employees at all levels to share their success stories.

Sponsor

  • Wambi.org – Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Healthcare Series: Having an Others-First Mindset | Brad Tieszen

Brad Tieszen is the Vice President of Operations at Parkview Health where he runs several specialty clinics. As a part of his daily routine, he’s intentional about being visible by ’s intentional about being visible by taking time to complete patient rounds and participate in huddles with his team. He’s fervant about recognizing excellence whenever he sees it, knowing it is key to unlocking engagement. 

In this episode, you’ll hear Brad share his passion for being actively engaged and living in the moment. 

Connect with Brad on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bradleytieszen/

Truth You Can Act On

1. Operate in the Moment
Supporting Quotes:

Brad Tieszen: “I have to be in the moment, and I have to be engaged with the tone of my voice, with the look in my eyes, and the language that I choose to use to inspire our people. And in return, they inspire me.”

Brad Tieszen: “All of our bandwidths are different, but that is where the intentionality comes in, that deliberate in the moment, onstage presence that I go back to. You just can’t take that time off.You can’t take a day off, a moment off, because that may be the moment of getting somebody from a six to a seven, or a seven to an eight. That moment of getting somebody from engaged to actively engaged.”

2. Recognize Excellence
Supporting Quotes:

Brad Tieszen: “I feel that all human beings from time-to-time appreciate being seen, and it motivates you to keep doing it. It reinforces those positive behaviors, and those recognitions of excellence, they can be around innovation, service excellence, special care. It can be as simple as just saying, ‘Hey, thank you.’ It can be, ‘Hey, welcome to the Parkview family. It’s your first day. It can be wild.’ ‘That was world-class teamwork.’ And it goes to their leader and that leader can do a bunch of stuff with it.”

3. Ask How People are Doing
Supporting Quote:
Brad Tieszen: “I will do one thing all the time where I say, ‘Hey, on a scale of one to 10, you know, 10 being the very best one being the rock bottom worst. Where are you personally and professionally?’ And I can get tens. I’ve gotten ones before. I can get some eights, but what I always do with that is I say, ‘Hey, you’re at an eight, how, how can I help get you to a nine?’ And to hear somebody say, ‘Well, you just did. Just by asking about how I am just got me to a nine.’”

4. Be Visible
Supporting Quote:
Brad Tieszen: “My challenge to myself every day, and therefore to the others, is to get out there and be visible. Get out there with your teams and with your people and be visible, whether it is leader rounds or being visible through the virtual platforms we’re on, you know, through a video message. Even though at times we can’t be as physically visible as we like, be creative and take advantage of the virtual platform and send a video message. Do everything you can in your leadership role, regardless of your leadership title, to say, ‘Who can I recognize today?’”

Book Recommendations

Sponsor

  • Wambi.org – Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Healthcare Series: Cross-Sectional Leadership Impact | Dan Woloszyn

Dan Woloszyn has been in executive hospital leadership for 23 years, including nine years in his current role as the CEO of Rehab Hospital of Indiana (RHI). He has a unique management approach, combining servant leadership with understanding the neuropsychology of corporate hospital systems. Not only does he believe in looking at this neuropsychology from a clinical perspective, but through an administrative lens as well.

In today’s episode, you will hear how he incorporates these two philosophies into his everyday life, along with tangible examples of how to apply cross-sectional leadership to your own work.

Truth You Can Act On

1. Reach out, communicate, and serve others.
Supporting Quotes:
Dan Woloszyn: “You don’t have to be expert in everything, but there is one thing that I really believe one has to be expert in, certainly from a leadership standpoint, is to reach out and know others, and to serve others . You have to have an expertise with that to kind of drive a reduction of silos and an elimination of silos. And that can be done through one’s own expertise or actively seeking other’s expertise.”

Dan Wolosyzn: “I think each person and each leader truly has to believe it’s a privilege to serve others unconditionally. There’s a professional and humanistic component to that. My true belief is you have to love something about the people you lead to be truly elite effectively. If you don’t love something about the people you lead, you probably are not in the right place, and you’re probably not in the right place to be a leader.”

2. Trust and transparency are the foundations of cross sectional leadership.
Supporting Quote:
Dan Woloszyn: “Being transparent about self, and certainly being honest, is extremely important. It’s being honest about one’s approach and any errors that might be committed and examples of approaches to correct the errors and how to grow with that. My belief is you have to think out loud and you have to be able to help others to get a sense of your own thought process as a leader and how you came to certain conclusions. I know sometimes that’s difficult for people to do, but it’s extremely beneficial where it helps in a sense to become kind of an external organizer for others, where you move from a point of, of brainstorming out loud a problem you might be faced with, verbalizing struggles, and even kind of working through some of those tactics out loud so others can benefit from a variety of things. I think what it does is it certainly lends to a relationship building and credibility and honesty and transparency.”

3. Model the behavior you are looking for in your culture.
Supporting Quote:
Dan Woloszyn: “First and foremost, it has to start with me. Laying the foundation has to be about modeling and certainly me believing in and what truly is important for our organization. There’s always an expectation to look at the glass half full and everything that we do in a respectful way while modeling that and handing off to others who also will hand off to others, and that kind of permeates throughout the system.”

4. Make it a habit to regularly invite your leaders for collaboration and relationship building.
Supporting Quote:
Dan Woloszyn: ”I think there’s a conscious effort to tie others, to create alliances, not only within the organization, but outside the organization, within our community and really address this kind of holistically. Concretely, we do this a lot. I invite staff and leaders, online staff leaders, all different, team members, to our department meetings. I invite them to board meetings. I have them look at operational pathways they’ve generated and share their stories, because without that you truly understand the nature of what everybody’s doing amongst the organization.”

Book Recommendation

  • Dare to Lead by Brené Brown

Sponsor

Wambi.org – Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

Subscribe to Gut+Science