Healthcare

Healthcare Series: Cultivating a Culture of Diversity and Inclusion | Ophelia Byers

Ophelia Byers is the VP and Chief Nursing Officer at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. She has more than 20 years of leadership experience, and in this episode, she discusses her passion: racism-related stress in the workplace. 

Listen as Ophelia shares moving stories of employees who have had such experiences and what leaders should be doing to gain awareness on this problem.

Book Recommendations: 

Sponsor Resources

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Assume We All Have the Opportunity to Sharpen Awareness
Supporting Quote
Ophelia Byers: “There is not always the awareness of what someone’s lived experience is at work. Our obligation is to do some vision correction, and that comes through awareness. It comes through learning and self-study. It comes through a variety of ways, but we have to first recognize that we do not see all and that we really need diverse perspectives from a diverse group of individuals to be able to be more aware.”

2. Identify Risks and Challenges to Prioritize Focus for Change
Supporting Quote
Ophelia Byers: “When we think about quality, we first think there are roadblocks. There are potential problems. There are actual problems. So first, it starts with problem identification or risk identification. That’s important, and that’s where that awareness comes in. Let’s all just assume that there’s an opportunity to dig deeper, think more expansively. So, in that risk identification or problem identification, you’re thinking about what are your employees going through. What are the safety risks? What are the adverse events or near misses and anyone in healthcare, we certainly understand those terms around the employee experience. Usually, we do it around patient safety, but let’s do it around the psychological safety of our employees.”

3. Diversity and Inclusion Is a Process
Supporting Quote
Ophelia Byers: “There should be a process to this. What we don’t want to do is treat diversity as something that, if we have multicultural potlucks or have “Wear Your Ethnic Attire to Work” day, or just have the crucial conversations around diversity. Those are all wonderful things that can certainly boost morale, but beyond boosting morale, what does structural change look like? And so making sure that there is a methodical approach to this, which this quality management approach can help improve, by taking all the information that we’ve gleaned and putting together an improvement process. Organized healthcare organizations are very familiar with processes, like plan, do, study, but really taking out some higher level themes and starting to say, okay, this is what we need to work on.”

4. Constantly Evaluate Your Organization’s Diversity
Supporting Quote
Ophelia Byers: “It’s continuing to have those dialogues to check back, continuing to monitor if our interventions have been effective. How are they landing with people? Is what we hope to achieve actually occurring? And it’s circling back to people that you spoke with to understand if the interventions that were put in place are going as intended. So, it is this self-check process to ensure safety through standardization, to ensure high reliability. And I think that in taking this approach, there’s not one organization that doesn’t understand quality. And so making diversity and inclusion about quality of care, not only for the customer, but also for the internal customer, for our employees, is a great way to promote structural change.”

 

Follow Gut+Science



Healthcare Series: The Climb to Destigmatizing Mental Health | Nigel Girgrah

Nigel Girgrah is the Chief Wellness Officer at Ochsner Health System where he strives to illustrate vulnerability and destigmatize mental health in the workplace.

During the pandemic, there was an increase in mental health needs. While mental health isn’t anything new, leaders are constantly having to adapt to new situations and environments.  In this episode, listen as Nigel shares how he and his team prioritize mental health awareness, destigmatization, and develop resources to help their employees perform at their best. 

Book Recommendations 

Sponsor Resources

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Get a Collective A-game
Supporting Quote
Nigel Girgrah: “There’s really no industry more complex than healthcare. As I think about it, in order to meet the challenges associated with healthcare reform, we need the collective of our healthcare workers to achieve great things. I look at wellbeing in the workplace as a vehicle to get there and burnouts are kind of an existential threat to achieving those goals.”

2. Remove Barriers
Supporting Quote
Nigel Girgrah: “Getting back to the need to de-stigmatize mental health,  I think there are two components to that. One is really creating a belief system that it’s okay to come forward. The second component is we have to remove barriers. I go back to SARS one in Toronto. Some of the good things that seem to happen from that is licensing agencies sort of removing explicit questions about mental health from license renewals. Credentialing boards for removing specific questions about mental health. It’s one thing to sort of say, ‘Hey, believe it. It’s okay.’ But if we send messages every year that say, ‘Tell me if you have a history of mental health.’ That sort of just creates confusion.”

3. Remember Your Strategy
Supporting Quote
Nigel Girgrah: “Pre-COVID, the office I lead had a pretty solid evidence-based wellbeing strategy that was just focused at that time on our physicians and our advanced practice providers. It was heavily focused on things like practice efficiency, promoting advanced team-based care, and developing our leaders because these were the things that appeared to drive professional fulfillment the most, and resilience is a part of that.”

4. Practice Vulnerability
Supporting Quote
Nigel Girgrah: “Everybody has their own story, but people probably aren’t prepared to come forward with this story. I sent an open letter in September to all 30,000 employees that was entitled: ‘How are you really?’ I talked about myself. I talked about the mental health stigma in healthcare, and the reception was overwhelming. It was the most read executive message that had been sent out. And it wasn’t just people reading it. There were two-page email responses. It really seemed to resonate, and I say that because vulnerability precedes trust.”

Follow Gut+Science



Healthcare Series: Prioritizing Inspiration as Leaders | Estrella Parker

Estrella Parker is the Chief Human Resources Officer at Satellite Healthcare / WellBound where she aims to create a great patient experience by inspiring employees and team members. 

In this episode, you’ll hear Estrella speak on the importance of building workplaces where employees experience meaning and how the first step to achieving that goal begins with listening and inspiration. 

Book Recommendation:

Sponsor Resources: 

  • The Resilience Workbook – Strengthen your organizational resilience and align team goals with The Resilience Workbook,  a free 12-page resource to mitigate clinician burnout. Download it here
  • Interested in continuing the discussion? Sign up to receive Wambi’s newsletter

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Listening Creates Meaning
Supporting Quote
Estrella Parker: “Start with listening and when you’re listening, you give space to that person you’re listening to. Sometimes we listen through surveys, right? And so one of the things that we do is really pay attention to what people are saying, what our patients are saying, and when you couple that with what the organization is about the mission that we have, the values that we have, it becomes then a task of making sure that we connect that. We connect the meaning of what they’re doing, the meaning of their role, the meaning of the situation, to what matters to them and to what matters to the organization.”

2. After Listening, Appreciate Them
Supporting Quote
Estrella Parker: “Inspiration is driven by human to human connection, and typically we connect by listening, hearing, and seeing each other. So when I use the word listening, I do mean not just listening with your ears, but really with all of your sensory experiences. It’s what we have to teach our managers to do, our employees to do, state work with their patients or with each other. We also have to learn how to create moments of appreciation and recognition when those are done right and done well.”

3. Inspiration Starts with You
Supporting Quote
Estrella Parker: “Managers have to be the primary communicator experience architect for workers to be able to connect fully as human beings and create meaning around the work that they’re doing so that it is inspiring for them. Part of the jobs of managers, inspiring managers and leaders, is to understand each individual person in their team because each of us is motivated in different ways.”

4. Inspiration Humanizes the Workplace
Supporting Quote
Estrella Parker: “As human beings, we are not doing things. We are actually doing things because they’re meaningful to us. That is what inspiration is really about, and in the modern workplace we’re so driven by technology and we’re getting pinged all the time and everyone has learned how to be productive. It’s really important to inspire people so that their whole being shows up in the situations they’re in at work.”

Follow Gut+Science



Healthcare Series: Providing Meaningful Connection | Bonnie Barnes

Bonnie Barnes is the Co-founder and CEO of The DAISY Foundation, a nonprofit organization that recognizes excellence in nursing with the DAISY Award. The award is celebrated in more than 4,700 healthcare facilities, and over 156,000 nurses have been recognized formally since the Foundation began.

In honor of Nurses Week, Bonnie speaks on a topic that is integral to the mission of The DAISY Foundation – meaningful recognition. Listen as she describes the steps towards incorporating meaningful recognition into an organization and why it’s so critical to retaining great nurses and combating burnout. 

Sponsor Resources

  • Celebrate National Nurses Week with Wambi – Meaningful recognition fuels everything at Wambi. In honor of nurses, we’d like to invite you to our celebration of uplifting and recognizing the essential contributions of nurses nationwide. This resource hub is filled with workbooks, toolkits, a nurses gift guide, upcoming nurse-related events, inspiring reads, partner initiatives, and a spotlight on the 1st Wambi Year of the Nurse Award. Visit our National Nurses Week Hub today!
  • Interested in continuing the discussion? Sign up to receive Wambi’s newsletter

Book Recommendations

Truth You Can Act On

1. Meaningful Recognition is Personal
Supporting Quote
Bonnie Barnes: “The way that I think about meaningful recognition as it’s been described in the literature is that it’s recognition on steroids. What makes it meaningful is it’s personal. It’s personal to the recipient. It’s specific about what is being recognized for that person or for that nurse. It has a long lasting impact on the person who’s receiving it, it acknowledges specific behavior, and very importantly, the impact it had on a patient, family member, or coworker. It’s relevant to the situation and the nurse’s contribution.”

2. Collect Stories
Supporting Quote
Bonnie Barnes: “When the organization goes out and solicits nominations from patients and families and coworkers, whether they’re written nominations or electronically submitted nominations, they really spread that culture of recognition around the organization. That’s what makes a difference. That’s probably the most important aspect. It’s getting those stories, and it takes building awareness of the opportunity for patients and families and coworkers to say, thank you to make that happen. It’s the collecting of stories and really encouraging rich descriptions of what a nurse has done.”

3. Include Executive Leadership in Recognition Practices
Supporting Quote
Bonnie Barnes: “We have a program dedicated to honoring nurse managers and other leaders. We call it the DAISY Nurse Leader Award. The reason we created it was because we’re well aware that when we started the DAISY Award it was really designed to honor direct-care nurses for extraordinary compassion at the bedside or chairside. But what about those people that are creating the environment where all this compassionate care is thriving? Well, those are nurse managers and other leaders, and we didn’t want to miss the opportunity to express gratitude or to enable the staff to be able to say thank you to their managers. So we created the DAISY Nurse Leader Award. I would say that when nurse managers feel the recognition themselves, when they experience it for themselves or one of their peers, it will never be another statement about, I don’t have time, because once they feel it, they know what a difference it makes.”

4. Leverage Virtual Platforms
Supporting Quote
Bonnie Barnes: “With all kinds of social distancing going on, what I have found has been especially special has been the ability to do these presentations virtually. So now, instead of having just the people in the unit participate, they get hundreds of people on these Zoom meetings. And very often I’m there, which is the most fun thing I get to do is to participate in these Zoom presentations. It’s really wonderful.”

 

Follow Gut+Science



Healthcare Series: Getting Back to the Basics | Michelle Mahaffey

Michelle Mahaffey is the Chief Human Resources Officer at Community Health Network. She has a colorful background and career journey, transitioning to the healthcare industry at the beginning of the pandemic. 

In this episode, you’ll hear Michelle share her unique perspective on the difference between a healthy culture and an engaged culture, and how leaders need to model the behavior they want to see.

Tune in to hear her view on making sure employees feel supported.

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Separate Health and Engaged
Supporting Quote:
Michelle Mahaffey: “You really kind of have to separate out healthy and engaged at first and then bring them back together. When we think about being healthy, each one of us is an individual and we’re responsible for our own health. But as employers, we do have a role, and we can’t make our employees take care of themselves. But what we can do is we can reassure them that we support them and taking care of themselves. We can provide resources and programs. We can support them in utilizing those resources and programs, and that is huge as an employer”

2. Model Wellness Behavior
Supporting Quote
Michelle Mahaffey: “It’s not just saying to someone take care of yourself. That’s not enough. We, as leaders and managers, have to model the behavior. We have to make it okay and actually something that we’re proud of them for. So, model behavior by taking time off, and I mean, actually take time off, you know, like, don’t jump on every single conference call or team call while you’re on vacation, because your employees expect that that’s what they’re supposed to do. So model the behavior and engage in healthy activities outside of work, and then share it with your team.”

3. Re-evaluate Job Scopes
Supporting Quote
Michelle Mahaffey: “Coming out of a pandemic is actually a really good time to do a sanity check on what it is that we’re asking our employees to do. Are the jobs scoped appropriately, both from a responsibility perspective, from a time perspective? Have we asked people to do what used to be 40 hours of work? Have we asked them to do that in 30 hours so they can do something else for 10 more hours? That happens over time. It happens when we go through cost-cutting measures. It happens naturally as people get better with their jobs, too. But are we doing that appropriately?”

4. Communicate Clearly and Regularly
Supporting Quote
Michelle Mahaffey: “We have got to communicate with people. It’s not just sending an email. It’s not just sending a video. It’s not just posting on a website. It’s not just having one-on-one communication. It’s all of those things in the way that makes sense for your workforce and your employees, because we’ve got to make sure that they know what’s going on and that we care about them and they hear the message. Make sure that employees understand the mission of the organization and that they feel they understand, see the connection between what they do every day in their jobs and that it has an impact on the organization’s mission.”

Sponsor Resources

  • Wambi.org – Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.
  • The Resilience Workbook – Strengthen your organizational resilience and align team goals with The Resilience Workbook,  a free 12-page resource to mitigate clinician burnout. Download it here.

Book Recommendations

Follow Gut+Science



Healthcare Series: Practicing Intentional Leadership in a Virtual World | Dr. Scott Rissmiller

Dr. Scott Rissmiller is the Executive Vice President and Chief Physician Executive for Atrium Health, an integrated nonprofit health system with 42 hospitals and over 1500 care locations.

Scott is passionate about people and culture, which manifests itself into the way he interacts with his team. In this episode Scott shares insights on how Atrium Health has supported employees and patients during the COVID crisis, as well as small practices you can utilize to help make intentional leadership a part of our daily routine. 

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Fail Fast
Supporting Quote:
Dr. Scott Rissmiller: “I believe the culture we had put in place allowed our teams to come together rather than fragment and allowed them to focus on the patient and really work together. There was trust there that we were going to do everything we could to take care of them and to take care of our patients at the end of the day. And I’m also a big believer in setting the direction, putting up some wide guard rails, and then getting out of the way to let our leaders lead and make decisions. Sometimes we’re going to make mistakes. That’s okay. Learn from it, move on, dust off, and let’s get back at it.”

2. Practice Intentional Leadership
Supporting Quote
Dr. Scott Rissmiller: “When we’re in person, we can read body language better, and we can see people’s expressions. You miss that in virtual calls, so you really have to double down on being real and really demonstrating and showing that you care. We have really focused on making sure in our meetings that we are checking in on each other. We’re asking those sensitive questions that might connect in different ways with people and really focusing on giving that encouragement and positive feedback because people are isolated. They want to do really good work, but they don’t have the interaction that they normally have that gives them that reward. So really double down on the positive feedback and encouragement.”

3. Over Communicate
Supporting Quote
Dr. Scott Rissmiller: “Over communicate. You cannot over communicate. So when you think you’re ever communicating, do it more and do it multimodal, whether it be virtual or emails or other things, make sure it’s consistent, and make sure it’s frequent.”

4. Share Authentic Stories of Impact
Supporting Quote
Dr. Scott Rissmiller: “It’s even more important today for leaders to show up with positive energy and optimism while we tackle these tough problems. And be real, just like with our courageous conversations, don’t shy away from the things that might be a bit uncomfortable, because again, in this time of virtual, it’s easy to just stay at the surface level. Dig deep, make it consistent, and build people up. Then connect back to why we went into this to begin with. There is a practice that is just incredible, which is called connect the purpose, where we start every meeting, and I mean every meeting, with a patient story of how we have delivered incredible care, and what we meant to that patient.”

Book Recommendations:

Sponsors Resources:

  • Wambi.org Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.
  • HCAHPS Case Study – Learn how University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health used Wambi to improve employee engagement and patient experience, and found that the Wambi platform is an early predictor of the HCAHPS. Download the case study here.

Subscribe to Gut+Science



Monday Fire: Reason. Season. Lifetime.

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you live more fully and intentionally?

Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

 

Subscribe to Gut+Science



[Throwback] Healthcare Series: Building a Mission Employees Follow | Steve Long

Steve Long is the President and CEO of Hancock Regional Hospital, where he has helped develop a unique culture of inspired and engaged employees. Before taking over at Hancock, he served for 20 years in various healthcare leadership roles across the country.

The motto at Hancock Hospital is, “What a blessing it is to work in a place where we love people for a living.” This motto, coupled with their goal to be nationally recognized for kindness, has created a special culture of caring; A culture that is so tangible, you can actually feel the difference as you walk through the doors.

In this throwback episode, Nikki revists the conversation she had with Steve about creating a mission employees want to follow. Steve is a strong believer in creating and living by a core mission statement, in both your organization and in your personal life. To find your personal mission, ask yourself: what kind of legacy do you want to leave?

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Hire the Right People
Supporting Quote:
Steve Long: “This is why we hire for just the right kind of folks, because it comes from that intrinsic sense of ownership, that intrinsic sense that I have a part to play here. So we make sure that we hire for that. Again, it gets down to the attitude. It’s the difference between a person that sees a piece of trash in the corner of a room or on the edge of a hallway and walks by it and says, ‘Well, I sure hope that the person whose job is to pick it up, comes and picks that up.’ Then compared to a person who says, ‘Wow, I really don’t want our place to look like it’s not clean, so I’m going to stop and pick it up and throw it away.’ That’s the difference, and that’s what we look for as we hire people — the ones that are going to reach down, pick it up, and throw it away.”

2. Track Goals and Progress 
Supporting Quote
Steve Long: “We look at our goals and our objectives. We program ourselves to look at outcomes. For example, have we seen a measurable improvement in patient safety? Have we seen an improvement in patient experience scores? And it’s not about did I walk through the unit four times in the last week? That’s an activity. What we actually measure and what we hold ourselves accountable for are the outcomes, and we do that because we have built an incentive plan that is actually organization-wide. We have both organization-wide incentive plans, and we have department-level incentive plans, and they’re also based on these outcomes.”

3. Build Employee Ownership 
Supporting Quote: 
Steve Long: “I was building a house, and as I was framing it up, my boss, who was a physician, a very busy leader in academic medicine, came over to my place on a Saturday and he spent half a day cutting boards for my house. I was so impressed that he cared enough about me, that he would take time out of his very, very busy schedule on a weekend to come and help me work on my house. Because he did that and he showed that he cared about me, my loyalty to him and my desire to do the things that we needed to do as an organization, really were a result of his investment in me.” 

Book Recommendation:

Sponsors:

  • Wambi.org Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

Subscribe to Gut+Science



Healthcare Series: Human Connection | Cassandra Crowe-Jackson

Cassandra Crowe-Jackson is the Chief Experience Officer at Sharp HealthCare with over 20 years of leadership experience in the industry. She is passionate about human connection and its power to create meaningful impact.

In this episode, Cassandra shares her best practices for daily meaningful connection with team members, as well as ways to make the most out of virtual connection.


Truth You Can Act On 

1. Increase Your Visibility
Supporting Quote
Cassandra Crowe-Jackson: “We’ve been talking about leadership visibility, because even our leaders, our executive team, we’ve been told you’re working from home from now on. So how is it that you’re going to be able to connect with your team, especially, you know, in a 24/7environment? So, you know, we do have our entity or facility leadership or the CEOs and the executive teams rounding just to say to that team, ‘Thank you.  I know you’re here.’ Our CEO, as a matter of fact, did midnight rounds at one of our facilities that are more heavily impacted because you think about those nurses and doctors that are working that weekend night shift. They aren’t getting a lot of human connection.”

2. Incorporate Personal Check-in’s 
Supporting Quote
Cassandra Crowe-Jackson: “I’ve had to have a ton of virtual meetings. So when I start my virtual meetings and begin, you know, I always try to find the one question about you. It will be something more of my icebreaker in terms of, ‘What was the best thing that happened to you yesterday?’ Because that kind of stops people for a moment. Because they’re prepared to tell me all about their work and their role and what they can do to help me or what I could do to help them, but when I have taken that pulse and that beat, just to say, ‘What was the best thing that happened to you?’ Or, “What made your day?’ Or, ‘What were three things you were most grateful for yesterday?’ It kind of says, stop a moment and let’s connect here as humans first, and then we can talk business.”

3. Look for the Silver Lining 
Supporting Quote
Cassandra Crowe-Jackson: “Now for every hour of time, you log in that says you exercise, you are contributing one meal. So they’re taking that to mean five hours of walking is one meal for four people or something like that. So it’s again saying, ‘Keep doing what you’re doing, stay healthy, but while you’re staying healthy, you’re going to be helping people eat.’ San Diego has a lot of homelessness and a lot of hungry people, as does everyone in the country, and I can see feedback in the chats about, you know, what people are doing and how they feel connected to purpose still to our, our vision and our mission.”

Book Recommendations

Sponsor

  • Wambi.org – Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

Subscribe to Gut+Science



[Throwback] Healthcare Series: Employee Engagement in Healthcare | Vicki Hess

Vicki Hess is an engagement expert, author, thought-leader, and speaker, and she is passionate about inspiring healthcare leaders to take action and transform engagement. 

In this throwback episode, listen in as she and Nikki reveal the tools you need to create the environment you and your employees want to work in.

Learn more about Vicki at vickihess.com.

Truth You Can Act On

1. Make Engagement Part of the Organization’s Strategy 
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “What I see that doesn’t work is when the survey becomes a big push, it becomes like the flavor of the month. And all of the sudden now we’re focusing on the survey and we want everyone to do the survey. And if you turn in your ticket, you’re gonna get a prize. And the managers like, please, please, please take this survey. And Edwards like, oh, whatever, you know, and they take this survey. And the reason they say, oh, whatever is because last year when this happened, the survey results came back. They had the requisite action planning meeting. They all got in a room. They looked at the results. They said what they wanted to have to get better. And then they never heard anything again.”

2. Take Action
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “When somebody says to me, we have a people pillar and it’s an agenda item on every single meeting we have and all of our performance reviews are related to that and et cetera. Then I’m like, they’ve got a strategic connection. So the organizations that do well with sustaining engagement over time, they go from what I call engagement dread where the managers like, oh, I got to talk about the survey and, you know, do an action plan to the engagement thread where you weave engagement into everything that you’re doing. “

3. Make Manager Engagement Skills a Priority 
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “If it’s truly important, it’s got to be part of the strategy. It doesn’t have to be compensation related for leaders, but it definitely has to be some measure of their success has to be related to the engagement levels of their team. The other thing is there’s got to be the tools for training and teaching managers how to be effective, engaging leaders. And it can’t be a flavor of the month.”

4. Right Mindset and Belief Make Strategies Work
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “These unproductive beliefs and mindsets that organizations let thrive, that they let go on are often the cause of disengagement. At an organizational level, then leaders feel helpless. Their mindset might be, but what can I do about this? And then individuals there, their negative mindset as well. It’s somebody else’s job to make me happy at work. And so unless those things are addressed and talked about. Now, the cool thing is we know what the unproductive beliefs are. We just have to be willing to talk about this elephant in the room or the sacred cow.”

Book Recommendation

Sponsor

Wambi.orgWambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

Subscribe to Gut+Science