Healthcare

Healthcare Series: Building a Culture of Pride | Brian Helleland and Mary Ann Perez

Brian Helleland, CEO, and Mary Ann Perez, Director of Care Experience work at St. Jude Medical Center in Southern California. While they have different roles in the company, both are passionate about nurturing pride for their organization.

In this episode Brian and Mary Ann speak to the importance of training and how it is the job of a leader to make culture tangible.

Truth You Can Act On

1. Own Culture Initiatives
Supporting Quote
Brian Helleland: “We’re not shy about talking about hashtag St. Jude pride or the St. Jude pride campaign. We’re transparent about it. We’re not trying to manipulate or trick anybody that we’re creating this culture to make people happy to be here. We want our staff to be part of generating the pride and that we’re all building this pride together. Not that we’re trying to build it as leaders.”

2. Share Positive Stories
Supporting Quote
Mary Ann Perez: “I saw a lot of stories from our own caregivers with photos, maybe of a poster that a community member had left out in one of our parking areas. And just every time the caregiver posts, at the end they have #StJudePride. It’s not just the organization saying how important St.Jude pride is, but our own caregivers recognizing it and feeling it themselves. They don’t feel like they can tell a story of St. Jude without including the hashtag St. Jude pride.”

3. Be Human-Centered
Supporting Quotes
Mary Ann Perez: “We have an applause program, which actually generates about a thousand to 1400 per quarter of recognitions that come from patients and families. They go from caregiver to caregiver, from physicians. In addition, we have an online recognition form where we receive recognitions again from caregiver to caregiver, in addition to online stories. Another mechanism we have in place is our daily huddles, and our daily huddles occur in every department every day, and we highlight a different caregiver’s story.”

Brian Helleland: “One of the other things that I use as a metric is how many of your caregivers do you know by name? Executives are embarrassed sometimes to go around and talk to people and are afraid to introduce themselves because they may not know the caregiver by name or the employee by name, and I’m like, that’s fine. Go out in another couple of days and go out, and when you didn’t know 50 people’s names, maybe the next time you don’t know 30 people’s names. And at some point in time, you’re going to know almost everybody’s names, but those there’s little things to just get over on employee relations and be a relationship driven organization.”

4. Make Your Rounds
Supporting Quote
Brian Helleland:  “It starts with the leadership. You’ve got to invest, not just money, but you’ve got to invest time. You’ve got to walk the halls and talk to people. I tell our leadership all the time. If rounding is not your favorite part of the day, you’re doing something wrong.”

Book Recommendations

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Healthcare Series: Using Reflection to Recharge | Maureen Fagan

Dr. Maureen Fagan is the Chief Nursing Executive at University of Miami Health System in Miami, FL. She is passionate about leading resilience and helping people recharge. 

In this episode, Maureen recounts her leadership journey this year on the frontlines of healthcare and shares best practices to help employees find their “reserves”. 

Truth You Can Act On 

1. Listen to Hear and Empathize 
Supporting Quotes

Maureen Fagan: “You see an executive that’s on the floor in what we would call the trenches. That’s our slang for being on the unit and seeing the patients and meeting the patients and hearing their stories, and I can see that when I do that nursing leadership in the end, the nurses on the frontline that are their staff step back and listen to me. They listened to me talking to the patient. And when I’m talking with the patient, I’m cognizant of the fact that I’m modeling the behavior, that I would like them to have the comportment of what I would like them to be providing.”

Maureen Fagan: “You’re staying on point with what the patient is explained to you. And if the patient is sad about, um, having gotten COVID and they just couldn’t believe it, and that they didn’t think it would happen to them, you’re obviously saying, ‘I’m so sorry that this happened to you.’ You’re being able to meet them where they are at this moment. So what you’re doing is focusing the negative mindset that the patient is in currently, and then you’re saying, in your mind, ‘How am I actually going to be focusing on something positive?’ So you’re taking that mindset, that negative mindset, and giving it the reframe that we talked about to something positive.”

2. Don’t Take the Bait
Supporting Quote

Maureen Fagan: “I think if you reflect back and use the lens of objectivity, you know, I know I got triggered by when he, or she said this or that. And then that made me do what? I tell my staff, and I’ve told myself this for years, don’t take the bait when something is happening right there. There might be somebody that you’re having a conversation with and it’s becoming provocative for some reason, and you want to make a point. I think if you actually respond back with, ‘Well, you know, I think that because ___,’, that actually just cascades. And so when you’re looking back on this after the event is over or the conversation is over, I think when you reflect back that begins your process of how you restore and rejuvenate yourself based on your reflection.”

3. Take Time to Recharge
Supporting Quote

Maureen Fagan: “Part of my self-care is when I get home, I am quiet for a solid hour. I don’t watch television. I don’t read. I sit outside and I think sitting outside, no matter what the temperature is, if you’re dressed the right way to be able to actually breathe without your mask outside, without anyone else being around you is a saving grace in this pandemic.”

4. Have Energizing Talks
Supporting Quotes

Maureen Fagan: “One of the things we like to do is to come on [Zoom] a little bit earlier and just chat it up. That’s been fun because whoever is on early, you get to say hello to and talk about other things, too. And when the new folks come on, you can see them come on before they actually come on. So, if you’re already talking, the other person realizes, ‘Oh, you know, I really want to talk to these people, too.’ And now we have another two minutes before we’re actually going to start the Zoom. So I find that a lot of fun.”

Maureen Fagan: “I think to be, to be a little silly changes the energy in a room and to be silly with, um, without hurting someone’s feelings. So silly stays in a realm of being funny and being childlike in its environment. And that is a very high energy field to be like that it’s like singing, singing is another very high energy field that you can capture. But silliness does that too.”

Book Recommendations

Sponsor

  • Wambi.orgWambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Healthcare Series: A Culture Philosophy in 5 S’s | Bernie McGuinness

This episode of Gut+Science Healthcare is a throwback to a guest Bernie McGuinness, Chief Executive Officer at Majestic Care. The business specializes in community-based skilled nursing throughout Indiana, including short-term rehabilitation, long-term care, and memory care. With more than 20 years of experience in senior healthcare management, Bernie understands the inherent stresses of the modern-day healthcare professional.

You’ll hear Bernie share how he fosters a “culture first, people first” organization and his desire to develop emotional ownership for his care team members. He also breaks down his “Five S’s” strategy; a system that empowers people to take big ideas and turn them into daily strategies for sustainable and prolonged growth.


Truth You Can Act On – The 5 S’s

1. Shine
First impressions make incredible impacts. Continued impressions create expectations. What does your physical work environment say about your culture? Set a high priority on fostering a clean and inspiring environment to demonstrate the value of your employees.

2. Smile 
Turnover is high in many industries, including healthcare. Don’t overlook or undervalue the basic need of all employees: to feel welcomed and appreciated. A warm greeting manifests a winning culture of people-first.

3. Start Strong 
Start each and every day out strongly. Promote the importance of employees arriving and starting their tasks on time. Start every meeting exactly when scheduled. These daily acknowledgments of respect fuel a culture of success.

4. Swagger
A confident employee shouldn’t be a random anomaly. Confidence stems from a deep understanding of not only internal products but also dynamics within your industry. Strive for swagger by providing your employees with tools to be informed and engaged.

5. Show Off
It’s easier for management to take pride in what they do, as they tend to see the bigger picture of how all of the moving parts come together. Foster this sense of pride and ownership within your workforce by promoting employees at all levels to share their success stories.

Sponsor

  • Wambi.org – Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Healthcare Series: Having an Others-First Mindset | Brad Tieszen

Brad Tieszen is the Vice President of Operations at Parkview Health where he runs several specialty clinics. As a part of his daily routine, he’s intentional about being visible by ’s intentional about being visible by taking time to complete patient rounds and participate in huddles with his team. He’s fervant about recognizing excellence whenever he sees it, knowing it is key to unlocking engagement. 

In this episode, you’ll hear Brad share his passion for being actively engaged and living in the moment. 

Connect with Brad on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bradleytieszen/

Truth You Can Act On

1. Operate in the Moment
Supporting Quotes:

Brad Tieszen: “I have to be in the moment, and I have to be engaged with the tone of my voice, with the look in my eyes, and the language that I choose to use to inspire our people. And in return, they inspire me.”

Brad Tieszen: “All of our bandwidths are different, but that is where the intentionality comes in, that deliberate in the moment, onstage presence that I go back to. You just can’t take that time off.You can’t take a day off, a moment off, because that may be the moment of getting somebody from a six to a seven, or a seven to an eight. That moment of getting somebody from engaged to actively engaged.”

2. Recognize Excellence
Supporting Quotes:

Brad Tieszen: “I feel that all human beings from time-to-time appreciate being seen, and it motivates you to keep doing it. It reinforces those positive behaviors, and those recognitions of excellence, they can be around innovation, service excellence, special care. It can be as simple as just saying, ‘Hey, thank you.’ It can be, ‘Hey, welcome to the Parkview family. It’s your first day. It can be wild.’ ‘That was world-class teamwork.’ And it goes to their leader and that leader can do a bunch of stuff with it.”

3. Ask How People are Doing
Supporting Quote:
Brad Tieszen: “I will do one thing all the time where I say, ‘Hey, on a scale of one to 10, you know, 10 being the very best one being the rock bottom worst. Where are you personally and professionally?’ And I can get tens. I’ve gotten ones before. I can get some eights, but what I always do with that is I say, ‘Hey, you’re at an eight, how, how can I help get you to a nine?’ And to hear somebody say, ‘Well, you just did. Just by asking about how I am just got me to a nine.’”

4. Be Visible
Supporting Quote:
Brad Tieszen: “My challenge to myself every day, and therefore to the others, is to get out there and be visible. Get out there with your teams and with your people and be visible, whether it is leader rounds or being visible through the virtual platforms we’re on, you know, through a video message. Even though at times we can’t be as physically visible as we like, be creative and take advantage of the virtual platform and send a video message. Do everything you can in your leadership role, regardless of your leadership title, to say, ‘Who can I recognize today?’”

Book Recommendations

Sponsor

  • Wambi.org – Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Healthcare Series: Cross-Sectional Leadership Impact | Dan Woloszyn

Dan Woloszyn has been in executive hospital leadership for 23 years, including nine years in his current role as the CEO of Rehab Hospital of Indiana (RHI). He has a unique management approach, combining servant leadership with understanding the neuropsychology of corporate hospital systems. Not only does he believe in looking at this neuropsychology from a clinical perspective, but through an administrative lens as well.

In today’s episode, you will hear how he incorporates these two philosophies into his everyday life, along with tangible examples of how to apply cross-sectional leadership to your own work.

Truth You Can Act On

1. Reach out, communicate, and serve others.
Supporting Quotes:
Dan Woloszyn: “You don’t have to be expert in everything, but there is one thing that I really believe one has to be expert in, certainly from a leadership standpoint, is to reach out and know others, and to serve others . You have to have an expertise with that to kind of drive a reduction of silos and an elimination of silos. And that can be done through one’s own expertise or actively seeking other’s expertise.”

Dan Wolosyzn: “I think each person and each leader truly has to believe it’s a privilege to serve others unconditionally. There’s a professional and humanistic component to that. My true belief is you have to love something about the people you lead to be truly elite effectively. If you don’t love something about the people you lead, you probably are not in the right place, and you’re probably not in the right place to be a leader.”

2. Trust and transparency are the foundations of cross sectional leadership.
Supporting Quote:
Dan Woloszyn: “Being transparent about self, and certainly being honest, is extremely important. It’s being honest about one’s approach and any errors that might be committed and examples of approaches to correct the errors and how to grow with that. My belief is you have to think out loud and you have to be able to help others to get a sense of your own thought process as a leader and how you came to certain conclusions. I know sometimes that’s difficult for people to do, but it’s extremely beneficial where it helps in a sense to become kind of an external organizer for others, where you move from a point of, of brainstorming out loud a problem you might be faced with, verbalizing struggles, and even kind of working through some of those tactics out loud so others can benefit from a variety of things. I think what it does is it certainly lends to a relationship building and credibility and honesty and transparency.”

3. Model the behavior you are looking for in your culture.
Supporting Quote:
Dan Woloszyn: “First and foremost, it has to start with me. Laying the foundation has to be about modeling and certainly me believing in and what truly is important for our organization. There’s always an expectation to look at the glass half full and everything that we do in a respectful way while modeling that and handing off to others who also will hand off to others, and that kind of permeates throughout the system.”

4. Make it a habit to regularly invite your leaders for collaboration and relationship building.
Supporting Quote:
Dan Woloszyn: ”I think there’s a conscious effort to tie others, to create alliances, not only within the organization, but outside the organization, within our community and really address this kind of holistically. Concretely, we do this a lot. I invite staff and leaders, online staff leaders, all different, team members, to our department meetings. I invite them to board meetings. I have them look at operational pathways they’ve generated and share their stories, because without that you truly understand the nature of what everybody’s doing amongst the organization.”

Book Recommendation

  • Dare to Lead by Brené Brown

Sponsor

Wambi.org – Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Healthcare Series: Building an Army of Culture Champions | Tria Deibert

Tria Deibert, VP of Culture at Hackensack Meridian Health, is a warrior for organizational culture. As a culture leader herself, she understands it takes a team, not a person, to build company culture. In today’s episode, you’ll hear Tria talk about the challenge of merging two organizations and the lessons she learned from that experience.

Truth You Can Act On

  1. Spend time making the vision, mission, and values real and livable.
    Supporting Quote:
    Tria Deibert: [6:54] “Your mission, vision, and beliefs, can’t just be a beautifully written statement. It needs to be real and livable. Finding the balance of that, what’s real and livable as you’re bringing organizations together, is really where the magic is.
  2. Create core beliefs and reiterate them constantly.
    Supporting Quote:
    Tria Deibert: [13:22] “When we did our research, we learned what the team valued, and that informed the development of our core beliefs. And what we heard thematically was teamwork, human experience, quality,  being highly reliable, and innovation. So, those are all great things to value, especially in healthcare, and they certainly speak to the mind, but when I looked at them, they didn’t speak to my heart, and I didn’t know that they would speak to our team members’ hearts. So we crafted our core beliefs. As I mentioned before, they’re affectionately known as the four CS kind of with this knowledge in mind. And so, you know, born out of that discussion was creative, courageous, collaborative, and compassionate. And so innovation became creative. I will do my part to make things better. Quality and HRO became courageous. I will do the right thing. Teamwork became collaborative. I embraced teamwork, and the human experience became compassionate. I am the human experience.
  3. Equip employees to be good storytellers of your brand and your culture.
    Supporting Quote:
    Tria Deibert: [12:24] ”The culture has to be really reflective of who you are and who you aspire to be. And the only way to get there is to listen, to and involve your team members, understand what they hold dear, and really work with them to create the future they want to see.”
  4. Be clear on the “why,” then give a really clear path letting them know the “how”.
    Supporting Quote:
    Tria Deibert: [16:01] “I worked with our culture champions to equip them with the key messages
    and materials. So I was very clear on the why, but they owned the, how. And really what made
    this successful was we gave them a structure. We gave them materials, but they were selected
    for a reason, and we really gave them the power and the ability to bring these messages and
    these ideas forward in different events that were specific to where they were.”

Sponsor: 

Wambi.org – Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

Book Recommendation:

  • The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein

Webinar

Back by popular demand after his first appearance on Gut+Science Healthcare, Dan Weberg is joining us again on our next Gut+Science LIVE session. We started Gut+Science LIVE as a catalyst to build community among our guests and listeners. This is a 30-minute virtual session with one of our popular guests and conversation is influenced by our listeners with questions they submit. In this upcoming session on September 9th, Dan and Nikki Lewallen will be talking about Fighting Toxicity at Work and how each of us can take a stance to break toxic habits. Toxicity should not be tolerated and each of us can play a part in dwindling down the statistics. Join us here!

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Healthcare Series: The Impact of Social Network Mapping on Engagement | Greg Matthews

Greg Matthews is an award-winning health innovator out to radically disrupt and improve the healthcare industry’s archaic methods for assessing true sources and patterns of influence. As an advisor to dozens of the largest and most successful healthcare companies in the world, he knows how to understand and quantify physicians’ behavior, networks and patterns of influence. On today’s episode, he shares his passion for data-centered innovation and how it affects engagement.

Truth You Can Act On

1. Engagement is about being part of something larger than yourself.
Supporting Quote:
Greg Matthews: “being able to connect yourself to a higher ideal is a big part of engagement and being able to do things that you couldn’t do on your own by being a part. Of a group of people focused on that.”

2. The connections your organization requires to function don’t follow your org chart.
Supporting Quote:
Greg Matthews: “that doesn’t necessarily mean that you have to throw out your org chart and replace it with a social network diagram, but that social network diagram can help you to actually understand how your organization functions on a day to day basis. It can show you where there are. Traps and blocks, uh, in communication and connection. It can show you where there are opportunities to enhance, um, communication and connection between individuals, between departments.

3. Promote the work of individuals on an organizational level.
Supporting Quote:
Greg Matthews: that doctor doesn’t necessarily have to adopt social networking behavior on their own. They don’t have to necessarily be responsible for emailing their colleagues to say, Hey, here are some cool things that our hospital is doing. The hospital can simply feature them in their content. Almost every employee loves to have the kind of recognition from the organization that says, Hey, we love what you’re doing, and we want to feature it as a way of talking about the great things our organization is doing externally.

Book Recommendation:

Sponsor: 

Wambi.org – Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

 

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Healthcare Series: Navigating Toxic Leadership | Dan Weberg

Dr. Dan Weberg is a disruptor innovator who gets fired up about breaking the cycle of toxic leadership in the healthcare industry. As a nurse leader, an expert in human-centered patient design, and the author of the first book of its kind, “Evidence-based Innovation Leadership for Health Professionals, ” today’s topic is one he knows well.

Truth You Can Act On

1. Leadership behaviors are as impactful to patient outcomes as medical errors
Supporting Quote:
Dr. Dan Weberg: [6:38] “Patient mortality increased and patient morbidity increased and, and so did errors. And that was directly tied back to this idea of a transactional toxic leader. One that, you know, holds a carrot out for good behavior in the stick when there’s bad behavior. And they were showing that patients were dying more on floors that were led by toxic leaders.”

2. Toxic leadership can be intentional or unintentional, but either way needs to stop.
Supporting Quotes:
Dr. Dan Weberg: [8:25] “The unintentional side is a symptom of the fact that we don’t train and treat leadership as a, as a practice like we do nursing medicine, you know, other professions, right? So, you know, there’s very intentional training to become a clinician, but there’s very little intentional training to become a leader.”

Dr. Dan Weberg: [10:35] “Toxic leadership is really where you got to kind of get rid of people because that’s where it’s, it’s this kind of focus on power and control.”
3. Teams experiencing toxic leadership have a 78% burnout rate and report decreased commitment to their organizations.
Supporting Quote:
Dr. Dan Weberg [12:41] “[Toxic Leadership] It 100% leads to burnout. We can’t help patients be healthy if we don’t have a healthy culture in which to deliver that care.”

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Healthcare Series: Recognizing Good Work | Terry Hamilton

Terry Hamilton, Executive Vice President and System Chief Operating Officer at Lakeland Regional Health, is a long time leader in healthcare. What stands out about Terry is how passionate he is about the people side of the business. For him, sharing gratitude and recognizing employees for the important work they do well is what being a leader in healthcare is all about. 

Truth You Can Act On

1. Say thank you and say it often.
[19:13] “The most fundamental thing you can do to demonstrate gratitude is to say, thank you. And then you have to know what you’re saying. Thank you for, so you have to be intentional about finding the things that your people are doing that are great and say, thanks for that specific thing.” [19:29]
2. Carve out one on one time.
[16:25] our standard tools are gone. So being there and saying the right thing and providing assurance and trying to enter into this as much as you can with them is the illustration to me of gratitude for workers at this particular time. [16:41]
3. Call people by name.
[25:06]I wanted to thank him, but I didn’t know his name. And I’ve always been nice to my housekeeper, but I didn’t know his name. And I resolved from that moment. I’m never not going to know. My housekeeper’s name because that’s a measure of gratitude as well. And a measure of recognition. [25:24]

Sponsor: 

Wambi.org – Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

Book Recommendation:

 Thrift Store Saints by Jane Knuth

Healthcare Series: Intentionally Building Relationships | Shane Carter

Shane Carter is the Chief Nursing Officer at Advocate Aurora Health, the 10th largest not-for-profit integrated health system in the United States.

Listen in as he and Nikki reveal the ways building relationships will impact your culture.

Truth You Can Act On:

    1. Know your individual employees beyond their job title and responsibilities: What are they excited about in life right now? What hobbies are they into?
      [00:12:47] I asked those questions, not because I feel obligated to, I ask those questions because I honestly care.[00:12:52]
    2. Make live personal connections as often as possible.
      [00:19:33] What I try to practice as much as I preach is really get out and make that connection. Have those conversations. My team knows, do not send me an email that goes past two sentences. I just won’t read it. Um, and maybe that’s a negative thing, but they know that you’re better served by coming and finding me walking through the concern, the situation following up that way.[00:19:55]
    3. Don’t assume how people are doing, rather, ASK then just listen
      [00:28:02] One thing that I will never do again is just assume that leaders are in a good spot. You need to check up on them and you need to get in their environment and really talk to them. [00:28:13]
    4. Lead by example to help others see the value of relationship building.
      [00:16:24] I always put a picture of either my family or one of my hobbies up there, let them know that I live in Amarillo, a small town just West of here, and really try to connect with them. [00:16:33]

Sponsor:

  • Wambi.org – Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

Book Recommendation:

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