Podcast

Monday Fire: Habit Stacking

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!
Our question for you today:
What habits can you stack onto the routine you have?
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Healthcare Series: Building a Culture of Pride | Brian Helleland and Mary Ann Perez

Brian Helleland, CEO, and Mary Ann Perez, Director of Care Experience work at St. Jude Medical Center in Southern California. While they have different roles in the company, both are passionate about nurturing pride for their organization.

In this episode Brian and Mary Ann speak to the importance of training and how it is the job of a leader to make culture tangible.

Truth You Can Act On

1. Own Culture Initiatives
Supporting Quote
Brian Helleland: “We’re not shy about talking about hashtag St. Jude pride or the St. Jude pride campaign. We’re transparent about it. We’re not trying to manipulate or trick anybody that we’re creating this culture to make people happy to be here. We want our staff to be part of generating the pride and that we’re all building this pride together. Not that we’re trying to build it as leaders.”

2. Share Positive Stories
Supporting Quote
Mary Ann Perez: “I saw a lot of stories from our own caregivers with photos, maybe of a poster that a community member had left out in one of our parking areas. And just every time the caregiver posts, at the end they have #StJudePride. It’s not just the organization saying how important St.Jude pride is, but our own caregivers recognizing it and feeling it themselves. They don’t feel like they can tell a story of St. Jude without including the hashtag St. Jude pride.”

3. Be Human-Centered
Supporting Quotes
Mary Ann Perez: “We have an applause program, which actually generates about a thousand to 1400 per quarter of recognitions that come from patients and families. They go from caregiver to caregiver, from physicians. In addition, we have an online recognition form where we receive recognitions again from caregiver to caregiver, in addition to online stories. Another mechanism we have in place is our daily huddles, and our daily huddles occur in every department every day, and we highlight a different caregiver’s story.”

Brian Helleland: “One of the other things that I use as a metric is how many of your caregivers do you know by name? Executives are embarrassed sometimes to go around and talk to people and are afraid to introduce themselves because they may not know the caregiver by name or the employee by name, and I’m like, that’s fine. Go out in another couple of days and go out, and when you didn’t know 50 people’s names, maybe the next time you don’t know 30 people’s names. And at some point in time, you’re going to know almost everybody’s names, but those there’s little things to just get over on employee relations and be a relationship driven organization.”

4. Make Your Rounds
Supporting Quote
Brian Helleland:  “It starts with the leadership. You’ve got to invest, not just money, but you’ve got to invest time. You’ve got to walk the halls and talk to people. I tell our leadership all the time. If rounding is not your favorite part of the day, you’re doing something wrong.”

Book Recommendations

Sponsor

Wambi.orgWambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Monday Fire: Simple Gratitude Journaling

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!
Our question for you today:
How can you incorporate gratitude journaling in your routine?
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106: Understanding the Coaching Effect | Bill Eckstrom

Bill Eckstrom is the Founder of EcSell Institute, a global research based organization that works with leaders to help them better understand, measure, and elevate coaching’s impact on performance. Bill’s primary passion is growth, especially the growth that occurs in individuals and teams as a result of coaching. 

In this episode you’ll hear Bill discuss the different qualities and quantities of successful leading, and the importance of measuring the impact you want to have.

Truth You Can Act On

1. Humanize One-on-One Meetings
Supporting Quote
Bill Eckstrom: “The biggest complaint people have about having one-on-one meetings with their boss is, ‘All my boss wants to talk about are the numbers. That’s my one-on-one meetings. It’s really a review of my pipeline. Nothing that my boss couldn’t get, my manager coach couldn’t get from the CRM. They just want to talk about results.’ Here’s what’s interesting. The most critical component when we think of quality of coaching, the baseline, the foundation for growth and performance, is relationship and one-on-one meetings. The biggest sin we see within those is the manager. The coach is not using them to further perpetuate a relationship. That’s the biggest mistake within the one-on-ones. The way they should be done is there should be a connectivity, a way to build trust, further relationship with initial personal updates. And as simple as they sound, you’d be shocked at the number of people who don’t use a one-on-one to just take the time to say, ‘Hey, how was your weekend?’ That’s really what’s needed.”

2. Make Feedback Constant
Supporting Quote
Bill Eckstrom: “Feedback should be woven into the fabric of any relationship between boss and employee. Feedback should be natural. It should always be there. It should not be always so formal that it means I have to sit down. No. Feedback should always be there, and that needs to look and take on more of a form of questions than anything else.”

3. Challenge Your Employees
Supporting Quote
Bill Eckstrom: “The catalytic factor is the ability of a leader to effectively challenge me and put me in a state of discomfort to create growth, because growth only occurs in a state of discomfort. So basically what that is saying is, I could be a wonderful meter in terms of creating relationships. I could do a lot of these things, but if I don’t challenge my people, if I don’t make them uncomfortable in a healthy way, we’re not growing.”

4. Measure Impact
Supporting Quote
Bill Eckstrom: “Measure. It’s that simple. You know, you could teach all this. You could promote all this. You could try and bring this into your organization, but that’s really insignificant if you’re not measuring its impact. If you don’t create a baseline of it, whether it’s through engagement or some other way, if you don’t create a baseline and understand it. It’s just logical. There should be a force to process or measure. Train, educate, implement, and track. And step number one is to measure. What I would tell people is, you can talk about it all you want, which is really insignificant because if you’re not measuring it you have no idea if it’s going up, down, or sideways.”

Book Recommendations

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Monday Fire: Special Gratitude Touches

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

How can you recognize or thank a coworker?

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Healthcare Series: Using Reflection to Recharge | Maureen Fagan

Dr. Maureen Fagan is the Chief Nursing Executive at University of Miami Health System in Miami, FL. She is passionate about leading resilience and helping people recharge. 

In this episode, Maureen recounts her leadership journey this year on the frontlines of healthcare and shares best practices to help employees find their “reserves”. 

Truth You Can Act On 

1. Listen to Hear and Empathize 
Supporting Quotes

Maureen Fagan: “You see an executive that’s on the floor in what we would call the trenches. That’s our slang for being on the unit and seeing the patients and meeting the patients and hearing their stories, and I can see that when I do that nursing leadership in the end, the nurses on the frontline that are their staff step back and listen to me. They listened to me talking to the patient. And when I’m talking with the patient, I’m cognizant of the fact that I’m modeling the behavior, that I would like them to have the comportment of what I would like them to be providing.”

Maureen Fagan: “You’re staying on point with what the patient is explained to you. And if the patient is sad about, um, having gotten COVID and they just couldn’t believe it, and that they didn’t think it would happen to them, you’re obviously saying, ‘I’m so sorry that this happened to you.’ You’re being able to meet them where they are at this moment. So what you’re doing is focusing the negative mindset that the patient is in currently, and then you’re saying, in your mind, ‘How am I actually going to be focusing on something positive?’ So you’re taking that mindset, that negative mindset, and giving it the reframe that we talked about to something positive.”

2. Don’t Take the Bait
Supporting Quote

Maureen Fagan: “I think if you reflect back and use the lens of objectivity, you know, I know I got triggered by when he, or she said this or that. And then that made me do what? I tell my staff, and I’ve told myself this for years, don’t take the bait when something is happening right there. There might be somebody that you’re having a conversation with and it’s becoming provocative for some reason, and you want to make a point. I think if you actually respond back with, ‘Well, you know, I think that because ___,’, that actually just cascades. And so when you’re looking back on this after the event is over or the conversation is over, I think when you reflect back that begins your process of how you restore and rejuvenate yourself based on your reflection.”

3. Take Time to Recharge
Supporting Quote

Maureen Fagan: “Part of my self-care is when I get home, I am quiet for a solid hour. I don’t watch television. I don’t read. I sit outside and I think sitting outside, no matter what the temperature is, if you’re dressed the right way to be able to actually breathe without your mask outside, without anyone else being around you is a saving grace in this pandemic.”

4. Have Energizing Talks
Supporting Quotes

Maureen Fagan: “One of the things we like to do is to come on [Zoom] a little bit earlier and just chat it up. That’s been fun because whoever is on early, you get to say hello to and talk about other things, too. And when the new folks come on, you can see them come on before they actually come on. So, if you’re already talking, the other person realizes, ‘Oh, you know, I really want to talk to these people, too.’ And now we have another two minutes before we’re actually going to start the Zoom. So I find that a lot of fun.”

Maureen Fagan: “I think to be, to be a little silly changes the energy in a room and to be silly with, um, without hurting someone’s feelings. So silly stays in a realm of being funny and being childlike in its environment. And that is a very high energy field to be like that it’s like singing, singing is another very high energy field that you can capture. But silliness does that too.”

Book Recommendations

Sponsor

  • Wambi.orgWambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

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Monday Fire: Create a Vibe You Thrive In

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!
Our question for you today:
What vibe can you create to help you thrive?
Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

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Episode 105: Embracing a “Feed-Forward” Mentality | Bill Auxier

Bill Auxier is the President and CEO of Dynamic Leadership Academy where he specializes in executive coaching, specifically in the healthcare industry. 

In this episode, Bill breaks down the method called team stakeholder-centered executive coaching, and discusses the power of personal assessments and feedback.

To learn more about Bill and team stakeholder-centered executive coaching, you can tune into his podcast Rural Health Leadership Radio at rhlradio.com or visit his website at billauxier.com 


Truth You Can Act On 

1.  Focus on One Thing to Make a Difference
Supporting Quote
Bill Auxier: “For the executive team, they felt like they needed to become better communicators, but one of their big picture objectives was improving employee engagement. So working with them, identifying a goal, a team goal around communication, and then working on that with each of the senior leadership team members, as well as a group. Each person created their own individual goal that contributed to the team goal, and through that stakeholder centered coaching process, we measure the results of their growth in their behavioral change and their growth and communication.”

2. Pivot Feedback to Feed-Forward
Supporting Quote
Bill Auxier: “Feedback is important to me because I can learn from it, but I can’t change anything, whereas feed forward is a suggestion on how I can improve in the future. We can’t change the past. We can learn from the past, but we’re all striving to perform better in the future. And that’s why we want to emphasize feed forward because to a certain extent, we got to let go of the past. The past is behind us. We learn from it, yes, but we need to let go of the past. Then in that moment live in the present and then work towards the future. And that’s what feed forward is all about.”

3. Change Your Behavior
Supporting Quote
Bill Auxier: “If I told you that I was wanting to become a better listener, because I think I need to be a better listener, and I think it would make a big impact on our ability to work together. So occasionally I’d like to ask you for some feedback and feed forward. I can read all kinds of books, I can Google how to be a better listener. I can read all these articles. I can be doing all these trick things in my brain to be a better listener, but if I never asked you if I’m being a better listener, how am I going to know if I’m being a better listener? I can learn from that. I’m constantly asking you for feedback and feed forward, so after a while, you’re going to say, ‘Hey, I guess they are taking this seriously, and he really does want to become a better listener.’ And then when I implement an idea that you suggested to me, you’re actually going to notice it because you suggested it to me…And so not only am I changing my behavior, you’re noticing how my behavior is changing because we’re always talking about, and so that’s how you can change behavior and the perception of that behavior simultaneously.

4. Say “Thank You” After Feedback
Supporting Quote
Bill Auxier: “When you ask someone for feedback, after someone tells you, you can only respond with two words, sometimes three words, but those two words are ‘Thank you’, or you could include their, their name, ‘Thank you, Nikki.’ The reasoning behind that is, has anyone ever asked you for feedback about something, you give them feedback and then they tell you why you’re wrong? Does that encourage you to give that person more feedback? No, because they didn’t really want feedback. They want you to agree with whatever they did. So if you’re going to ask for feedback, and if you’re going to build trust, and if you’re gonna encourage others to do this again, when you ask for feedback or when you ask for feeds forward, after you listen to what they say, you don’t interrupt them. You let them tell you what they’re going to tell you. You can only respond with two or three words. ‘Thank you’, or “Thank you, NAME.’ That’s it.”

Book Recommendations

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Monday Fire: Build That Habit

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!
Our question for you today:
What habit can you build today? 
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Monday Fire: Bring People Together

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!
Our question for you today:
How can you be a catalyst to bring people together? 
Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

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