Podcast

Monday Fire: Who Will Help You Reach Goals?

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!

Our question for you today:

Who can help push you to reach your goals?

Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

Subscribe to Gut+Science



Monday Fire: Maximize the Good to Better

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!
Our question for you today:
What can you maximize your life?
Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

Subscribe to Gut+Science



[Throwback] The Keys to Developing Effective Mentorship Programs | Alison Martin

Alison Martin is the Founder and CEO of Engage Mentoring, a mentoring movement seeking to elevate people in the workplace. She is also the author of Learning to Lead Through Mentoring: 8 Mentoring Lessons to Help You Pursue Meaningful Mentoring Relationships.

Alison’s passion for mentorship comes from reflecting on the opportunities she had early in her career. She credits her success to the great mentors who helped her realize her leadership potential. Because of the positive effect mentorship has had on both her professional and personal life, she now strives to equip others with the opportunity for meaningful mentor relationships.

In this throwback episode, listen as Alison and Nikki discuss how mentorship can increase employee engagement. Not only does it help transfer knowledge to help mold strong leaders, but Alison believes it gives employees a stronger sense of purpose knowing there’s someone else invested in their development. 

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Learn and Master Feedback
Supporting Quote
Alison Martin: “As I look back, there are several people that come to mind, honestly, but the one that was really instrumental in my career was a woman by the name of Pat. I first met Pat when I put my hat in the ring for a position that I was wholly unqualified for, and she gave me an interview anyway. And I ended up working for Pat for a period of time. And she was both. So when I reported to, but also a mentor for me, which not always is the case for most people, but she was, she really took me under her wing and gave me the feedback that I needed when I needed it, and that’s not always fun, but that’s what ultimately helps you grow.”

2. Develop a Personal Board of Directors
Supporting Quote
Alison Martin: “In other words, if I want to develop my skills as a public speaker, or I want to be more effective as a team builder, I can go in and identify people who have identified that particular competency. And it’s a much faster way to learn than going out and having to take a course or look at some other resource. And finally, the last category is having a career mentor. Someone who really understands what your career goals are and can help you really see a path  and offer strategic advice for how you’re going to get there. And so whether you have one person, or multiple people,  it’s not the frequency as much as it’s really feeling like you have a well-rounded personal board of directors.”

3. Leaders Must Participate
Supporting Quote
Alison Martin: “On the surface, you look at mentoring, you think, okay, that’s a learning strategy. So we’re going to help people who have knowledge and wisdom to transfer that knowledge to the next generation. And certainly, we can all agree that that is an important piece of this, but mentoring also impacts employee engagement because like I said, feeling like there’s someone else there who is pouring into you really cares about your development is a critical piece in the overall engagement. Iit also impacts diversity inclusion. So being able to connect to others on the basis of the knowledge and really empowered to take charge of your own development. And then lastly, I think just an overall culture in terms of when you teach people how to teach and how to lead effectively for others.”

4. Measuring Impact Through Intentionality
Supporting Quote
Alison Martin: “We first seek to understand if they are in fact measuring employee engagement numbers and what those numbers are telling them. And so through their diagnostic services, what’s our baseline? Because that helps us really understand what it is we’re trying to accomplish and what we’re trying to impact. And so, over time seeing movement and the numbers of people who are actively engaged,  seeing things like promotability as a result of structured mentoring. So we try to seek to understand, you know, what are your employee engagement numbers telling you now, and how are you measuring that?”

Book Recommendation

Subscribe to Gut+Science



[Throwback] Healthcare Series: Employee Engagement in Healthcare | Vicki Hess

Vicki Hess is an engagement expert, author, thought-leader, and speaker, and she is passionate about inspiring healthcare leaders to take action and transform engagement. 

In this throwback episode, listen in as she and Nikki reveal the tools you need to create the environment you and your employees want to work in.

Learn more about Vicki at vickihess.com.

Truth You Can Act On

1. Make Engagement Part of the Organization’s Strategy 
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “What I see that doesn’t work is when the survey becomes a big push, it becomes like the flavor of the month. And all of the sudden now we’re focusing on the survey and we want everyone to do the survey. And if you turn in your ticket, you’re gonna get a prize. And the managers like, please, please, please take this survey. And Edwards like, oh, whatever, you know, and they take this survey. And the reason they say, oh, whatever is because last year when this happened, the survey results came back. They had the requisite action planning meeting. They all got in a room. They looked at the results. They said what they wanted to have to get better. And then they never heard anything again.”

2. Take Action
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “When somebody says to me, we have a people pillar and it’s an agenda item on every single meeting we have and all of our performance reviews are related to that and et cetera. Then I’m like, they’ve got a strategic connection. So the organizations that do well with sustaining engagement over time, they go from what I call engagement dread where the managers like, oh, I got to talk about the survey and, you know, do an action plan to the engagement thread where you weave engagement into everything that you’re doing. “

3. Make Manager Engagement Skills a Priority 
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “If it’s truly important, it’s got to be part of the strategy. It doesn’t have to be compensation related for leaders, but it definitely has to be some measure of their success has to be related to the engagement levels of their team. The other thing is there’s got to be the tools for training and teaching managers how to be effective, engaging leaders. And it can’t be a flavor of the month.”

4. Right Mindset and Belief Make Strategies Work
Supporting Quote
Vicki Hess: “These unproductive beliefs and mindsets that organizations let thrive, that they let go on are often the cause of disengagement. At an organizational level, then leaders feel helpless. Their mindset might be, but what can I do about this? And then individuals there, their negative mindset as well. It’s somebody else’s job to make me happy at work. And so unless those things are addressed and talked about. Now, the cool thing is we know what the unproductive beliefs are. We just have to be willing to talk about this elephant in the room or the sacred cow.”

Book Recommendation

Sponsor

Wambi.orgWambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

Subscribe to Gut+Science



Monday Fire: Advancing Your Core Values

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!
Our question for you today:
What steps can you take to advance your core values?
Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

Subscribe to Gut+Science



[Throwback] Healthy Company Cultures: More Than Standing Desks and Yoga Classes | Rachel Druckenmiller

Rachel Druckenmiller is the founder of UNMUTED, where she works with leaders and their teams to build resilience and better relationships. When this throwback episode was first released Rachel was the Director of Wellbeing at SIG, where she acted as a catalyst in releasing possibilities for her people.

Many people think a healthy company means promoting healthy food, standing desks, and yoga programs, but these important initiatives only scratch the surface. For Rachel, a true healthy culture is one with underlying values that give employees the opportunity to grow, learn, and contribute to something bigger than themselves. 

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Inspire Employees to Connect and Build Relationships
Supporting Quote
Rachel Druckenmiller: “When it comes to relationships, this is making sure that you have somebody that’s a peer that you respect and admire, that can be your go-to person. As a leader there’s this idea that it’s lonely at the top. It’s true a lot, because what we can do as leaders is, when we start to feel insecure or limited or incompetent in some way or afraid, someone’s going to find this out, we isolate, and that is one of the worst things we can do.”

2. Provide Immediate Growth Opportunities
Supporting Quote
Rachel Druckenmiller: “I think back to when I started out, I mean, I was probably 22 years old and just starting in the wellness space, and I found out about this conference. That’s apparently like, you know, an important conference in my industry. And I went to our CEO and I said, ‘Hey, I think that I could learn a lot by going to this.’  I made a case for it and how I was going to come back and use the principles I learned, and he gave me permission to go. And you know, I think I was actually at an event, an HR event, a couple of months ago, and I overheard this guy saying, ‘Yeah, there’s this employee, we have this young employee, and he came in and you know, he’s only been there for two years and he thinks he can go to this conference. I had to wait 10 years to go to that buddy.’ That mentality is going to cause a lot of people to leave your company. If you think that they have to, you know, kind of go through whatever drudgery you had to go through to get to where you are, like, people don’t want to wait anymore.”

3. Involve Employees in Work Bigger than Themselves
Supporting Quote
Rachel Druckenmiller: “I think what really makes a difference relationally is if we were to recognize that every single person that we interact with wants to feel seen, heard, known, valued, and light, and they want to feel like they matter. At all levels, people want to feel this, and so I try to take that mindset into the work that I do. The conversations that I have with leadership, the conversations I have with my peers and with clients is that, look, we’ve got to just wake up, and we’ve got to start noticing people and recognizing that everybody’s dealing with stuff and everybody has dreams, and everybody wants to feel like they matter.”

4. Get to Know Your People
Supporting Quote
Rachel Druckenmiller: “One of the things that he has to say from a relational standpoint is that leaders have to care and they can’t care for people that they don’t know. And a lot of times in organizations I think people see their employees as just their role or just their position and a box to check. They don’t really invest in them or get to know them. One of the things I’ve experienced and in talking with other organizations that have done this effectively is they invite the person to show up beyond their role at work. So they know their kids, they ask questions, they know their spouse. It actually doesn’t take that much energy to do this, but people just don’t do it.”

5. Develop Employee Plans to Help Achieve Their Dreams 
Supporting Quote
Rachel Druckenmiller: “There’s a really great book called The Dream Manager written by Matthew Kelly, and it’s about this organization that brings in these people called dream managers. Then they actually have roles literally in the organization that support people to reach their dreams. So for instance, maybe somebody wants to buy a house. They’re the first person in their family that would be a homeowner, or they want to get a college degree or they want to, you know, go on a trip somewhere, or they want to get to a certain level in the organization. They literally assign these people who are employees to work with pretty much any employee in the company to kind of help them set up a strategy for how they can reach their dreams.”

6. Raise Your Hand and Ask for Help
Supporting Quote
Rachel Druckenmiller: “As a leader, a model, you need to be willing to ask for help. There’s a perception that if you’re leading that you have it all together and you have it all figured out. No. Show me that person who has it all figured out and all together.”

Book Recommendation:

Subscribe to Gut+Science



Monday Fire: Find New Ways to Give

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!
Our question for you today:
What are creative ways you can serve?
Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

Subscribe to Gut+Science



[Throwback] Healthcare Series: Leading with Gratitude from Within | Jill Kersh

Jill Kersh is the Owner of Thrive Unlimited and a certified life and career coach. She has a passion for equipping others to thrive through their own authentic connection to gratitude.

In this episode you will hear Jill discuss  focusing on what you have, not what’s missing, and how you can incorporate different routines in your day to help your gratitude practices.

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Focus on What You Have, Not What’s Missing
Supporting Quotes
Jill Kersh: “When you have a leader that’s grounded in gratitude, they’re focusing on what they have instead of what is missing. They make each employee feel seen and heard and appreciated, which leads to increased morale and decreased turnover.”

Jill Kersh: “When they’re in those negative thoughts, The leader is focusing on what’s missing. Oftentimes they’re using comparison. Avoid comparison; comparison, kills gratitude quicker than anything else.”

2. Gratitude Should Not Be an After-thought
Supporting Quote
Jill Kersh: “It’s a matter of choice. So the organization and a leader has to start from, you know, top down showing gratitude, and then it, honestly, it becomes contagious and everyone under them starts expressing heartfelt gratitude and that team comes together and it really has an incredible impact.”

3. Be Gratitude-focused to See Gifts in Situations and People 
Supporting Quotes
Jill Kersh: “These leaders have the ability to increase their success and  the success of those around them, they can see a gift in every negative situation. With their perspective of gratitude turned on and zoned in this often leads employees to flourish in the worst of times.”

Jill Kersh: “A leader that leads with gratitude instead of thinking, ‘Whoa is me’ in that situation, –which the team follows their feeling, by the way– they have that ability to go, “Gosh, what is the gift in this experience? How can we come out stronger and better than we ever have?” And when they start doing that, they start a conversation with their team that leads to brainstorming and creativity so that the company comes out stronger and better than if the mishap hadn’t happened. They choose to learn from every experience.”

4. Start Each Day and Conversation with Intention
Supporting Quote
Jill Kersh: “When we start coming from those places where we’re asking things like that, and we’re saying prayers, and we’re coming from appreciation  to start our days with intention, we instantly get to a better place…and as soon as you start thinking about what you’re learning from the experience, you instantly start moving into a place of gratitude.”

5. Adopt Daily Rituals for Gratitude Practice.
Supporting Quotes
Jill Kersh: “People that have these gratitude practices daily, so those core leaders have a hundred percent of people feeling more joy around them. 84% felt reduced stress and depression, 80% experienced more energy, and they were able to create optimism.”

Jill Kersh: “Gratitude instantly connects you to everything else. So when they’re leading from gratitude, they’re more connected to their employees, their friends, their families, they’re very connected to their missions and their life purpose.”

Book Recommendation:

Sponsor

Wambi.org Wambi is about human connections. We view feedback as the fuel for interpersonal growth and are always striving to achieve the highest versions of ourselves and to lift others up along the way.

Subscribe to Gut+Science



Monday Fire: Get Ahead of New Year Goals

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Here we go!
Our question for you today:
How can you get ahead?
Subscribe to get your Monday Fired up.

Subscribe to Gut+Science



[Throwback] 013: Employees First, Customers Second | Michael Crafton

Michael Crafton is the President and CEO of Nelbud Services Group. Founded in 2005, the company’s origins were humble to say the least, with only Michael’s pickup truck and $800 in hand. He has since grown the business into the largest self-performing kitchen exhaust hood cleaning company in the country and been recognized four times as an award-winning top workplace in Indiana. 

Michael strives to create a best-in-class employee experience and accomplishes this by creating sustainable careers that empower, attract, and promote an engaging culture.

In this throwback episode, you’ll hear Michael emphasize how the happiness and satisfaction of employees directly impacts customer experience. Michael also shares ways to integrate the mindsets and cultures of different regions, based on his experiences supervising numerous mergers.

 

Truth You Can Act On:

1. Happy Employees Create Happy Customers 
Supporting Quote: 
Micheal Crafton: “I may or may not have been accused of being survey happy, because I am. I absolutely love hearing how people are feeling and thinking. So we actually take legitimate and actionable steps when we do these surveys. And one of the things that we kind of preach is it’s kind of like, you can’t complain if you didn’t vote, you know, please tell us what you’re concerned with or what you’re really happy with so we can make it better or we can continue doing it. We did a survey back in December of 2017, and the number one thing we got back was work-life balance, which was kind of expected. You know, you kind of expect it, but you also don’t. I want to kind of realize it. And one thing we did from that survey, and I think it went a long way with the group, is we had two PTO days. We had a volunteer time, and then we kind of created this semi-flexible kind of emergency work time that they could use when they needed, and that was a direct reflection of that survey as a company.”

2. Rely on Employee Referrals When Hiring
Supporting Quote: 
Michael Crafton: “So there was a time in our business life cycle where 100% of our employees were employee referrals, and I really wish that kind of pace continued because it was kind of a self-policing kind of set the expectation for all, for all new hires, but also current employees, because everybody was a friend, but also a friend of a friend. It is absolutely critical to the success of our business. We estimate that it costs us between six and $10,000 to hire a person that leaves within the first hundred days. So for us, it’s important that we make the right hiring decisions at the right time for the right person, and we have, not a hundred percent, but I would say eight out of 10 employee referrals stay longer than 100 days. And typically, you know, two to three or four years or so we actually pay $250 every 30 days up to the hundredth day. So it’s a thousand dollars for the employee that referred the new person. And then we actually pay the new person 250 bucks dollars as well on their hundredth day as a kind of a reward for making it to that point. We kind of take a chance on, you know, in taking the referral from their friends, which I think is important.”

3. Dynamic Company Culture Must Adapt
Supporting Quote: 
Michael Crafton: “In January of 2015, we did a merger. It was actually the biggest merger we’ve ever done with a really large company on the East coast based out of Atlantic City. One of the things that we didn’t anticipate, and especially I didn’t anticipate, is both the East coast and the Midwest have really phenomenal, hardworking, passionate people who, I feel like are, you know, equals in the sense of characteristics, but on the East coast, the personalities are a lot different. The funny story I always tell is when I did the opening speech for the merger, you know, I’m from the Midwest born and raised and, you know, I’m typically really kind of flamboyant and I’m like happy and loud, and I like to hug people, and you know, on the East coast, it’s a lot more guarded and people want to get to know you before they hopefully kind of reach in for the hug. It was just a really weird dynamic. And to be honest, the failure that we had is I just thought instantly everybody was just going to buy into the culture and kind of love the vision and the mission. And it wasn’t like that. And it took us almost two entire calendar years to fully integrate and get that buy-in of especially the core values, which are in my opinion, the most important before we were able to kind of take that next step. And those first two years were very rocky. We went through a really unique time. Not that we performed poorly, we just didn’t hit the growth targets that we had set for ourselves pre merger, and I think that a lot of it had to do with the culture. So it’s been about three years now. We’ve beat budget every single month. We have more, our demand is so high that we’re having a hard time with our supply, meaning we can’t hire quick enough. Our customer service ratings are through the roof. We’re integrating or innovating as fast as we humanly possibly can, and we’ve done multiple acquisitions in the last six months that we hadn’t done in two years. So it’s 100% a testament to complete and total company buy into what we’re trying to accomplish as one team.”

4. Set Your Priorities
Supporting Quote: 
Michael Crafton: “For us, it’s really, really important that we focus on culture, talent skill, and in that order, because it’s not that there’s a lack of talented people out there. I think that there’s a lack of skilled people. And because we obviously, I said before, we have to train our people internally. So as long as we can find a culture fit  that is talented, we can teach the skill, whereas most companies, and where we were before, we would look for skilled people to fill roles, not paying any attention to the culture fit, or maybe the talent fit. To repeat, it’s culture, then talent, then skill third. So for us, as we continue to grow and as we focus on programs to not only teach that skill, but replicate the culture fit that they are to the team, it’s just, again, it’s really, really important that our senior managers stay engaged, and there has to be constant communication.”

Book Recommendation:

Subscribe to Gut+Science