Nikki Lewallen

Monday Fire Takeover: Herding Tigers: How to Lead Leaders with Oscar and Kiya Frazier

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. Oscar and Kiya Frazier bring the fire today with a discussion around leading other leaders.

When a leader is called to lead other leaders, how do you:

  1. Establish a level of authority that still recognizes the others as leaders.
  2. Create a direction for the group that leaders can follow
  3. Delegate tasks in a way that doesn’t place other leaders in a seemingly subordinate role.

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Be Worth* Following: Lead the Person, Not the Employee with Claire David, CareVet

You get out what you put in. The same thing goes for those you lead.

That’s why Claire David, Chief People and Culture Officer at CareVet, says you should be intentional about creating personal, not just transactional, relationships with those you work with. Claire was fortunate enough to find herself working for someone who invested in her success without ever expecting anything in return. Knowing someone had faith in her led Claire to work harder and pushed her to be a better employee.

Take a listen to Be Worth* Following, a new podcast under PeopleForward Network, to learn about the importance of focusing on the success of others and how that can pay off in numerous unexpected ways.

In this episode, you’ll learn:

  1. Invest in the success of others without expecting something in return
  2. Be intentional about building personal relationships, not just transactional ones
  3. Never stop improving, there is always work to be done

What to listen for:

  • [02:14] The most influential leaders in Claire’s life
  • [03:23] Building a personal vs transactional relationship
  • [08:52] The whole-person approach [11:47] Taking care of your team
  • [16:20] Lifting up an existing culture [19:04] Working with those whose value’s match yours
  • [23:04] Investing in the success of others
  • [27:37] The work is never done
  • [30:21] Hiring for the person, not the skills

 

128: Learn to Care, First | Bob Chapman

Bob Chapman was recently named number three CEO in the world. He is very intentional about using his platform to build a better world. Bob’s impact on the world has been massive, and it all centers around learning to care first.

Bob says, “Business could be the most powerful force for good in the world if leaders would embrace the awesome responsibility of leadership. Caring for people and giving them meaning, purpose, and fulfillment through their work is not in disharmony with creating value.”

Listen as Bob breaks down how leaders can embrace the responsibility and create an immediate impact.

Book Recommendations:

Additional Resources:

Learn more about the PeopleForward Network: www.peopleforwardnetwork.com

Truth You Can Act On

1. How are you giving your people a grounded sense of care?
Supporting Quote
Bob Champan: “Every leader’s responsibility is to give those people in their span of care a grounded sense of hope for the future. That is your primary responsibility. Whether you’re President of the United States, head of a department, running a company, to look at those people in your span of care as somebody’s precious child has been placed in your care for 40 hours a week and knowing that the way we lead our organizations impacts the way those in our care go home and treat their spouses, their children, and behave in our community. So I believe our responsibility is to care for the people we have the privilege of leading.”

2. Listening Is the Greatest Skill to Impact Change
Supporting Quote
Bob Champan: “Our focus every day is on our people and recognizing, and creating an environment where they feel valued. Listening to them when they have ideas. There are so many attributes that embody this practice of caring that becomes part of your DNA.”

3. Measure Success by the Way You Touch Lives
Supporting Quote
Bob Champan: “We impact a lot of people’s lives. Not just the people on a team, but our suppliers, our bankers, our communities. In our world, we have a measure of success, which is money, power, and position. And it really doesn’t matter how you get it, because if you get it, you can write big checks to charity and you feel you’re a good family because you did the greatest act of charity. It’s not the checks we write. It’s the way we treat the people.”

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127: How to Create A Speak-Up Culture | Stephen Shedletzky

Stephen Shedletzky (AKA “Shed”) wakes up every day to engage with people in meaningful ways, connect with depth, and live and inspire a more fulfilled world. He supports humble leaders. Those who know they are both part of problems they experience and a part of the solutions they create. Those who intend to put their people and purpose. Shed is a speaker, thought leader, executive coach, and advisor.

In this episode he shares his insights on how to create a “speak-up” culture and how it can transform organizations.

Book Recommendations:

Additional Resources:

Learn more about the PeopleForward Network: www.peopleforwardnetwork.com

Truth You Can Act On

1. Eliminate Toxic Positivity
Supporting Quote
Stephen Shedletzky: “Toxic positivity denies people of having negative emotions. Now here’s the thing. If you’re a human being, you have those, and if you show up to work or live in a place in which it is not okay to have certain emotions, what we resist persists. We need to allow our people to feel their emotions, and leaders need to meet their people at the heart.”

2. Celebrate Behaviors Not Results
Supporting Quote
Stephen Shedletzky: “We cannot control our results. All we can do is control our inputs. If we punish people for results or outputs that are literally outside of our control, it sends the wrong message. There’s a difference between losing and getting beat. When you’re beat it’s because the other team just totally outperformed you. You played great, but they earned a win when you lose it’s because you did things wrong and you should have done them better and you could have won. And so, if you get beat, you just tip your hat, focus on all the inputs you can continue to do, and, over time, if you get the inputs right the outputs will take care of themselves.”

3. Remember Work-life Integration
Supporting Quote
Stephen Shedletzky: “We’ve all heard the term work-life balance. I don’t like that term because it then denotes that it’s a scale. That is not the case. I think we felt that more than ever through the pandemic and for the vast majority of us working from home. I’m a big proponent of work-life integration and work-life harmony. Do you love who you can be when you’re working? Do you love who you can be and who you are when you’re in your life? If you don’t, you’re out of integrity or balance in one or both of those places. I think we’ve seen a shift to realizing now, more than ever, that human beings have lives outside of work that matter. And stuff happens with family and friends, health concerns, things that are far more important than work. And how, as organizations and leaders, do we allow that flexibility time and space?”

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126: Surrender Control and Empower | Amy Lynn Durham

Have you heard about spiritual intelligence or SQ? It’s a powerful component to the work in EQ or emotional intelligence.

Amy Lynn Durham is the founder of Create Magic at Work and a UC Berkeley certified executive coach. She teaches the 21 skills associated with spiritual intelligence and has witnessed the magic of the two of these practices.

In this episode, listen as she shares how SQ and EQ together can make a huge impact on human lives and how they can be an agent for workplace change.

Book Recommendations:

Creating Affluence by Deepak Chopra

Additional Resources:

Learn more about the PeopleForward Network: www.peopleforwardnetwork.com

Truth You Can Act On

1. Center on Peace and Put Ego Aside
Supporting Quote
Amy Lynn Durham: “Spiritual intelligence is the ability to maintain wisdom and compassion, inner and outer peace, regardless of the situation you’re in. So in the workplace, the ability to make decisions with wisdom and compassion, maintain inner and outer peace, regardless of the situation you’re in, breaking it down a little bit more. It’s the ability to put your ego aside and make decisions from a place of higher motivation, from a place of what some people might call their higher self. You can be agnostic. You can be an atheist as long as you believe that there is a place within you that you can access that comes from wisdom and compassion and love.”

2. Make Compassionate Decisions and Reframe the Situation
Supporting Quote
Amy Lynn Durham: “I have clients who aren’t making compassionate and wise decisions for themselves as leaders. So, they’re the leader who is overextending themselves is spending a ton of time on the phone with their employees, letting them vent to, taking on extra work so their employees can have the weekends off. Almost like the martyr. But they’re burning themselves out trying to show that they’re this empathetic leader. The downside to that is they’re not making wise and compassionate decisions for themselves and they’re going to burn out. And then on the flip side of that, I’ll have leaders that say, ‘Oh my gosh. I just can’t stand working with this person.’ And so then we walked through the flip side of that, which is reframing the situation. Rewriting the story in our head of why this person did that because we’re making it up in our head anyway. And so, the compassionate exercise on that side is you close your eyes. You envision that person and you say, ‘Just like me, this person is trying to seek joy in life.'”

3. Practice Radical Self-forgiveness
Supporting Quote
Amy Lynn Durham: “It’s all about skill-building. It’s all about radical self-forgiveness because we’re going to make mistakes. It’s all about just trying every day. It’s like lifting weights at the gym. You don’t start with a 50-pound weight if you’ve never lifted a weight in your life. You start with the small stuff.”

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125: Courage to Communicate Transparently | Elaine Bennett

Elaine Bennett is an award-winning speechwriter and passionate communications coach to executives. Early in her career, she worked with Warren Buffet and she has also won a Cicero Award for her writing on diversity, equity, and inclusion. In this episode, Elaine discusses the courage to communicate transparently.

Book Recommendations:

Additional Resources:

Truth You Can Act On

1. Start with the Constructive Feedback
Supporting Quote
Elaine Bennett: “We’ve all heard about the sandwich method. You compliment first and then offer your corrections or your constructive criticism and then give another compliment. What researchers are finding recently is that the people walk away with only the compliments ringing in their heads and not the constructive criticism. The recommendation I’ve read most recently is to start with the constructive criticism because that’s what you need your people to hear and that will benefit them more in the end.”

2. Simplify Your Communication
Supporting Quote
Elaine Bennett: “Tell the truth and use direct sentences. Avoid the passive voice. Short sentences, especially when you’re speaking. Short sentences are essential because your listeners can’t turn the page back and reread what you just said. Your spoken words are going to be different than your written words. And when you’re speaking, speak in short sentences, speak in short bursts, and say what you mean.”

3. Becoming a Vulnerable Leader Takes Practice
Supporting Quote
Elaine Bennett: “When you are transparent, you are indeed vulnerable. And it’s really hard to be vulnerable in front of people. When you’re by yourself, talk to the mirror, talk to your dog and say what you want to say. Get used to the feeling of vulnerability and realize that it’s not going to kill you. It’s just going to feel uncomfortable for a little bit. The more you do it, the less uncomfortable it will feel. Practice what you want to say to people before you say it and feel those feelings where it clenches in your body, where your muscles tighten, where maybe your stomach feels a little queasy or your head feels a little light. It’s not a terrible thing. It’s just you being human. And this is how being human feels.”

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Monday Fire Takeover: Perfect Labor Storm with Ira Wolfe

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. This Monday Fire is brought to you by Ira Wolfe, a prolific business writer, podcaster, and thought leader. In this episode he discusses the labor crisis sweeping the workforce and how leaders can weather the storm.

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Performa Subseries: Great Leaders Connect Via Values with Steven McCarthy

Steven McCarthy is the President and CEO of Curative Connections in Green Bay, a nonprofit dedicated to helping people with disabilities, aging concerns, and mental health challenges through a broad range of services. 

As CEO, Steven has made it a point to make sure their organizational values show in every aspect of their company. In this episode pretended by Performa, Steven shares ways Curative Connections and its employees model the organization’s values, allowing space for individuals and customers to thrive.

Book Recommendations

Additional Resources

Truth You Can Act On 

1. How Are Your Values Showing Up?
Supporting Quote
Steven McCarthy: “The first thing that you have to get right in order to lead with values is you have to be mindful about what your thoughts are. Those thoughts are your thinking patterns, ones that reflect all the very best in your organization’s values and what the community expects of you. So, if you have a mindset around compassion and empathy and honesty, respect and trust, if you are being intentional about driving out thoughts that do not comport with those values, that is how you get to a place where you’re leading with values, and people see that.”

2. Emotional Connection Humanizes the Workplace
Supporting Quote
Steven McCarthy: “You have to be intentional about caring about other people and valuing what’s happening in their own lives. Get outside your own head as a leader. You have to have those kinds of connections. Being genuinely interested in somebody’s personal life. We all come to work with stuff that happens outside the workplace. When you see somebody in the workplace, that’s just one small portion of them. They might be dealing with say an aging parent at home. They might have a child who’s having some struggles in school. They might have a child who’s going off to college for the first time. Somebody might be going through a divorce. It might be a baby’s first birthday. Maybe somebody lost a pregnancy. These are all kinds of things that people bring with them to the workforce. And I think in order for folks to allow vulnerability in that space, you have to first show and be honest about your own stuff that you’re bringing into the workplace.”

3. Your Workplace Should Give Your Purpose Space to Thrive
Supporting Quote
Steven McCarthy: “Our space was designed to help you feel warmly invited once you walk in. If you look at our walls, there is branding messaging on our walls that speak to our organization’s values. On other areas of our wall is  our tagline for the organization, which is, “empathy, experience, and empowerment.” We have huddle rooms for small groups to meet with clients, with other team members. Those sorts of spaces foster connectedness. They foster team building. They facilitate the kinds of crucial communications when you’re providing services to the community.”

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Monday Fire Takeover: Candidate Experience with Ira Wolfe

Happy Monday! Every Monday we drop some #MondayFire to help you get excited about your week. This Monday Fire is brought to you by Ira Wolfe, a prolific business writer, podcaster, and thought leader. Listen as he talks through creating a better candidate experience.

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124: Co-Creation: The Power of the Collective! | Jake Jacobs

Jake Jacobs is the CEO and Founder of REAL TIME STRATEGIC CHANGE, a global consulting firm specializing in helping organizations create fast and lasting results. Jake is also a best-selling author of three books. The most recent release this year is called Leveraged: 8 Ways to Achieve Faster, Easier, Better Results.

In this episode Nikki and Jake discuss co-creation and its power to drive engagement and collaboration in workplaces that end up in producing excellent results.

Book Recommendations

Additional Resources

Learn more about the PeopleForward Network: www.peopleforwardnetwork.com

Truth You Can Act On 

1. Eliminate the Blame
Supporting Quote
Jake Jacobs: “In some ways, it feels like a lonely place. I think it feels like the kind of organization where you carry an extra burden where you have a heavier load than you rightfully deserve, where there is a lot of blame and finger pointing because I’m not in it with you, I’m in it against you. So that notion of ‘we’re counting on you,’ well, that’s okay when you say that to a group of people, but when you say that to an individual, the level of anxiety is high. The level of frustration is high. The level of performance is low. And so, I think you can tell organizations that are not collaborative because people are leaving. I don’t believe most people stick around for an uncollaborative organization. They don’t want to spend their life in a place that is lonely, frustrating, and filled with conflict because it’s an us versus them mentality instead of a we mentality.”

2. Collaborating Must Be a Practice
Supporting Quote
Jake Jacobs: “How you create the organization counts. If I take an autocratic approach to creating a collaborative organization, well, you’re stuck at the starting line. You’ve never gotten off the blocks. So, having that be an ongoing conversation in the organization that asks what does it look like to have the people do interviews with each other about what a collaborative organization looks like and what does that mean? What do my skills and my abilities and my behaviors need to look like? What mindsets do I need to adopt? So, it’s both something that individuals take responsibility for but also leadership takes responsibility.”

3. Think and Act: the Future Is Now
Supporting Quote
Jake Jacobs: “If I have some image of what that future looks like, some picture of what collaboration looks like, if I think and act as if that were true today, then my choices and my behavior shift immediately. If I want to have a more collaborative team and I say one of the things I’m going to do in that future is listen more. I’m going to ask more questions. I’m going to listen more, and I’m going to integrate people’s thinking. In the very next conversation I have with a team member, I need to reflect that behavior and ask those questions.”

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